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ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



VOL. 33 NOVEMBER 30. 1936 NO. 22 

FEATURE ARTICLE 

UNITED STATES AGRICULTURAL TRADE WITH TERRITORIES 

(Page 667) 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Page 



Total v/heat production estimates 653 

European cotton textile outlook favorable 654 

Cuba increasing vegetable exports 656 

Spanish production of pickled olives reduced 657 

European wool situation improved 658 

France again permits milling of wheat in bond 658 

United States agricultural reexports, 1935-36 661 



652 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
LATS CA3LZS 



Vol. 33, No. 22 



A ustria 1936 crops reported, as follows, with 1935 coiapar i sons 
in parentiicses: Wiieat 13,522,000 tushels (15,509,000), rye 18,109,000 
(24,416,000), b-rley 11,620,000 (12,415,000), oats 27,764,000 
(26,924,000), corn 5,315,000 (5, 02r. , 000) , potatoes 91, 822, 000 "bashels 
87,908,000), ^a^i:J' beets 280,000 saort tons (1,165,000). (inter- 
nationo.l Institute of Agriculture, Eoiae, iJovember 23, 1936.) 

Algeria 1935^ grain -oroducti on estimated as follo\7s, with 1935 
comparisons in -orjrenthoses: ^neat 27,741,000 bushels (33,533,000), 
barley 31,957,000 (33,020,000), oats 9,645,000 b^ishels (7,288,000). 
(International Institute of Agriculture, Roine, November 23, 1936.) 

Argentine 1936-57 uneat yields excelle nt in several sections of 
wheat zone and prospects iiaprovir^ in others with the result that an 
outturn of about 237,000,000 bushels appears probable. (Agricultioral 
Attachd p. 0. IJyhus, 3uenos Aires, November 25, 1935.) 



tlovemlDer 30, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 653 

C 0 P . A i'T D A R A i] T P H 0 S P il C T ;s 



hr.£pj) GRAIliS 

Sug img^ry o f 1936 production 

Jistimates of.lS36 v mea.t production, as reported for 41 countries 
ether than China and the Soviet Union, total o , 324, 706, 000 fcushels as com- 
pared ■-/ith 3,407,722,000 "bushels hexvest<:;d ~bj the seme co^jatrios in 1935, 
when they .accounted for about 96 percent of the estimated "..orld total, 
excluding China aiid the Soviet Union. Reductions from 1935 are noted in 
many of the important who at-gr owing regions, l)ut prospects for the Southern 
Hemisphere countries point to a better lS5u-37 crop than v/as obtained last 
season. Declines in Australia and the Union of South Africa will be more 
than offset by ax. increase in Argentina, v/here tne crop is unofficially 
placed at frora 239,000,000 to 246,000,000 bushels. 

Although the combined crop of 28 European countries amounted to 
aoout 1,492,000,000 Dushels this year as compared v/ith 1,575,000,000 oushels 
in 1935, the outturn in the Danuoe Basin exporting co'untries vvas not only 
much larger txian the 1935 crop but exceeded ohe average for 1930-1934, 
Latest estimates lor those four cotmtries total ahout 363,000,000 bushels 
as compared with 302,000,000 bushels produced last yea,r. In the other 
European countries production has shov/n considerahle variation, "but their 
combined crop is about 13 percent under that of 1935. 

In tr.e Eorth Africai. countries, a decline of 17 percent is indicated, 
while the total for 3 Asiatic countries is about 27,000,000 bushels u:ider 
the corresponding figure for 1935, As a result of drought conditions, the 
Uorth American crop will also fall short of the small 1935 harvust. Por 
detailed statistics on production in all countries reporting for 1936, see 
page 692. 

The 1936 rye crop, as reported for 29 northern Hemisphere countries, 
totals 897,425,000 "bushels as against 967,515,00u busho-ls produced by the 
same co"unt:'i^s in 1935, The greatest reduction occurred in ilorth America, 
where the crop is less than half as large as that of 1935, but the total 
for Europe, outside of the Danube Sasin and the Soviet Union, is also con- 
sidere^bly unde. tne compc rcble total lor last season. The Danube Bc:,sin 
shows a gain of about 4,000,000 bushels, but this does not offset the re- 
duction in other European countries. The estimate lor Turkey indicates a 
drop of about 1,000,000 bushels. See table giving detailed production sta- 
tistics on page 694. 



654 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 22 

CROP AND MARKET P R 0 S P E C T S, C 0, N T'D 



COTTON 

Suronean cotton textile outlook favorable 
I' -— 

Developments in the European cotton textile situation during the 
first quarter (August-October) of the 1936-37 cotton season have generally- 
supported expectations of better- than-average total consumption of raw 
cotton this year, according to a report fron Agricultural Attachfe L. Y. 
Steere at Berlin. In no important country is there a prospect, at present, 
of any inaterial change as compared with the past cotton year. Fnere eon-' 
sum.pt ion was good, it has been well maintained or has tended to unprove 
slightly. In other countries, previously noted restrictions have con- 
t inued . 

In the United Kingdom, first-quarter business has been good in the 
home market, but recovery in export trade is still more of a hope than an 
actuality. The French cotton industry has experienced a fair revival in- 
cident to the devaluation of the franc, and, since this move has greatly 
Increased the chances for a policy of economic expansion, the outlook for 
the cotton industry remains hopeful. The Dutch and Swiss cotton industries 
have regained considerable com.petitive strength through devaluation, and 
some definite revival is expected. The same is true of Czechoslovakia, 
though exTDorts ivill doubtless be affected by Italy's reappearance on 
Balkan markets. 

Italy and G-ermany, on the other hand, remained m.uch restricted as 
consumers of raw cotton through October. Grounds for improvement are not 
evident in Germany, and Italy will probably see only a small gain in cotton 
textile mill activity in coming months, though exports of cotton textile 
products will be facilitated by the revalued lira. The abolisl-iment of the 
export boimties (dravjoacks ) hitherto paid by the Cotton Institute will at 
least partially offset the price advantage that Italian exporters xvould 
otherwise gain. 

The effects of the numerous devaluations of currencies have as yet 
been small, taking the European cotton industry as a whole. The devaluing 
countries have derived some benefit from improved export sales, but seem- 
ingly at the expense of other countries. Thus, the reappearance of Italian 
competition in southeastern Europe has taken av7S.y trade from Austria, 
Czechoslovakia, Germany, and Poland, notably in yarns in Yugoslavia. The 
same is doubtless true of other countries in other directions. However, 
there is reason to anticipate that a gradually increased demand for cotton 
goods will be generated by the restoration of more noimial currency and 
price relationships between the major European countries, both through en- 
hancement of consumer pur'^hasing power and greater readiness of distribu- 
tors to acquire stocks as monetary confidence and stability aro regained. 



l>jOveiriDer CO, 1936 iOreign Crops and Kiarkets 655 

•CriOP AND h AR Z £ T PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



Trie pr'ospects for central European .and Italian cotton .yarn and 
cloth export ousiness in 1936-5? seem definitely improved in one impor- 
tant sector, the' Danube 13asin, v/here large crops of both bread and feed 
grains and fairly good fruit crops have "been harvested, coincident v/ith 
favorable export price developments for all kinds of grain and fruit, and 
for livestock products. The capacity of the pea.sant population in that 
a.rea to buy cotton goods should be measurably increased this year, a fact 
that would, of course, also have favorable repercussions for the domestic 
cotton industries in those countries. 

European port stocks of cotton at the end of October were nearly 
50 percent higher tlian in 1933, when, however, stocks had generally f alien- 
to very low levels. Current stocks are by no means burdensome, or even 
large, in comparison with earlier years. 



COTTOh: Stocks in British and continental ports 

with comparisons 



October 31, 1936, 



Crov/th 


• Grep.t J 


Britain 


Continent 


Total Europe 


: 1::'35 


1936 


1935 


1936 




1936 




i 1 , 000 


1 , 000 


1 , 000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




; bales 


bale s 


bales 


bales 


bale s 


bales 






262 


217 


264 


401 


526 


Indian 




75 


33 


41 


63 


117 






39 


17 


12 


54 


51 






144 


29 


39 


44 


183 






346 


61 


77 


255 


323 






757 


357 


433 


817 


1,200 



The principal increases as compa.red v/ith a year ago are in stocks 
of Brazilian, iimerica.n, Sundries, and Indian staple, in the order named; 
and the bulk of the incree,se has occurred at British ports, over 300,000 
bales, with a rise of only some 75,000 bales at continental ports, largely 
Le Havre. 

Pav/ cotton buying by v/est-European countries has been active in the 
past 2 months; in some countries it nas been stiirralated by devaluation or . . . 
rumors of deva.luat ion. Central Europe ha,s been more conservative, and Germany 
and Italy have continued to operate under the usual restrictions, though Italy 
has initia,ted steps aimed at facilitating imports when liuKed with exports of 
goods. 



Price fluctuations of the principal growths during October have not 
greatly affected their relative values, except that Egyptian Uppers have 
becoiae as cheap a-s American cotton of corresponding staple. Spinners' 



^56 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, ITo. 22 

CxiCP AND hi A.-II K 3 T PROSPECTS, CON T'E 



margins in England, however, now favor the spinning of coarse counts, a 
factor favoraole to the use of American as against Egyptian cotton, prices 
of competitive growths at Liverpool moved a"bout in sympathy with American 
Middling, excepting for Egyptian Uppers. The latter fell more and rose 
less than American Middling during successive price changes so that, ly the 
end of October, the situation had "become fairly favorable for Uppers. 
BraziliazL and Indian growths have sold below Middling by alm.ost constant 
differentials during the past 2 months at prices miore favorable to their 
use th^n. prevailed prior to May for Indian and prior to mid-June for 
Srazilian, but at differentials less advantageous for their use than pre- 
vailed thereafter until late August. 



JPLUIT, VEGETABLES, MD WTS 

X/' Vegetable e^cports from Cuba expect ed to show 20-percent increase 

About 2,215,000 packages of vegeta/oles are expected to go forward 
fromi Cuba, to the United States during the winter vegetable season 1956-37 
(Hovember-April) , or 20 percent more txian in 1S35-36, according to a 
commmiication from Consul Harold S. Tewell at Habana. The critical month 
of October was passed ?/ithout severe storms and the growing sea.son so far 
has been characterized by generally favorable conditions. ' Unfavorable 
moisture conditions and dry winds are two damaging factors that still m.ust 
ce considered during the remiainder of the grov/ing season. Excessive ra.in- 
fall in some sections and drought in others have already caused damage. 

Exports of tomatoes are expected to am.ount to around 1,500,000 to 
1,700,000 lugs (of 30 to 32 pounds net) compared with actual shipments 
last season, November to April, of 1,318,000 lugs. Shipments started the 
first weeK in ilovem/Der. The lima bean crop is of excellent quality and 
exporting has started. The prospects are that arourii, 182,000 hampers 
(of 35 poxids net) will be ejcported in 193c-57 compared with 151,000 last 
y-^ar. Until the seasonal preferential tariff in the United States becomes 
applicable on December 1, Cuban fresh vegetable exports will consist largely 
^f lim^ beans, tomatoe:^;, and okra. Shipments of eggplant, peppers, and 
cucumbers do not promise much volumje luitil eaxly December. Exports of 
eggplant for the entire season now e.re not expected to be much greater than 
"■^he 173,000 crates (of 50 poinads net) sent to American markets last winter. 
Shipments of okra are not expected to exceed the 46,;''' :^_.ckages (of 35 
pounds net) sent to the? United States in 1935-36. Estiir/'-ues place the 
pro cable exports of ^-.reen pe-ppers at 2^^5,000 crates (of 45 pounds net; or 
about double the volume of last winter. Cucu mber exports will likely fall 
'^olow the total of SO.OOiJ crates (of 5 pounds net) exported to the United 
r^t.a.tes in. 193:3-35'. 



November 30, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 657 

CHOP A H D MARKET P E 0 S P E C T S, C 0 T'D 



Pi ckled olivo. s in th e Sev ille District of Spain ^ 

In view of present conditions in Spain, it has not heen possihle to 
secure acciirate information regarding the 1936 production of Queens and 
ManzanilDas in the Scvil.le Pistrict of Sioain. Stports from the American 
Consul at Seville, however, and information from Agricultural Attache 

I. Nielsen at Paris indicate that the crop was light with a total of 
ahout 7,500 short tons (nonclassified) of the two Vci.rieties having been proc- 
essed. T.'hile tnis estimate indicates an unusually small crop, it is 
possible tha.t later information may prove it to "be too conservative. In 
any case, there seems to he no question hut that the quantity pickled in 
1936 was considerably under the 32,000 short tons of Queens and Manzani lias 
estimated to have been processed in 1935. Moreover, it is said that the 
quality this season is below average. See production table on page 697. 

Queens 

The crop of Queens is reported to have been both small and of some- 
what poor quality. Preliminary information indicates that a total of only 
2,500 short tons was pickled, which is much below the 13,000 tons estimated 
to have been processed in 1935 and the 1929-1934 average of slightly more 
than 19,000 tons. 

Total supplies available for marketing in 1937 may be represented by 
the crop of Queens Just harvested as, in spite of the disturbed conditions, 
exports so far in 1936 have been at a fairly good rate. An equivalent of 
9,877 tons out of an estimated total supply for 1936 of about 14,000 tons 
of Queens had been declared for shipment to the United States up to and in- 
cluding Septsmbor 1936. (See table, page 697.) Vfhile practically no Queens 
were shipped during the month of August, an abnormally large quantity was 
sent to the united States when ships again started to call in September. 
It now appears that, as a result of the small quantity cured from the 1936 
crop, the supply of Queens during 1937 will be very sma.il. This situation 
recently caused prices to advance considerably (see ta.ble on p-xge 696). 
In connection with prices, it is interesting to note that a short time ago 
the loc.:-l authorities nj.led that quotations on all commodities exported 
from the Seville District must be given in foreign currency. Eor this 
reason, quotations for the United States are now being given in dollars. 

Ma nzani. l ias 

Just as in the case of Queens, the quantity of Manzanillas cured 
from the 1936 crop was relatively small. The quantity processed is reported 
at 5,000 short tons, which, while possibly a little conservative, is very 
small when com.pared with 19,000 tons processed from the 1935 crop and the 
1923-1934 average of 15,750 tons. 



658 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 22 

CROP AlID MARKET PROSPECTS, CON T'D 



Total s^xpplies for the year 1936 vzer-? fairly large, although they 
were not very much different from those in oxistence during the preceding 
season. The foreign demand so fa.r this season has "been rather good with 
declarations for shipment to the United St?tes during the first 9 months 
of 1936 showing an increase over the corresponding months of 1S35. (See 
table, page 697.) Likewise, the demand within Spain v/as good up to July 
1936, hut has heen reduced since. TJhile it is difficult to estimate; the 
carry-over of old-crop Manzanillas as of Jaxiuary 1, 1937, it is believed 
that this carry-over will "be as large as, ai d ; ossi"bly ?omc;.'hct lai'ger 
than, that on January 1, 193 6. Regardless o' vvha!. the carry-over will "be, 
however, total supplies for 1957 -.lill undoubtedly "be substantially under 
those for 1936, due to the comparatively small quantity of oJives cured 
from the 1936 crop. For this reason, prices of Mar zanil'' ^.s have already 
"been increased and will possi"bly c-ntinue at a relatively high level. 



LIVESTOCK, MEAT, M'D ¥00L 

, /' Cont inental European wool situation Improved 

The wool textile industries in western Europe, except in Germciny, 
have continued to e^.perience relatively favorable developments during 
Octo"ber amd at the "beginning of November, according to a report from Agricul- 
tural Attache, L. V. Steere at Berlin. The French industry, in particular, 
has been frvored by new orders and by active caJls for delivery on old con- 
tracts, both of which are traceable to the effect of the recent devaluation 
of the franc. Satisfactory conditions also are reported from Belgium. In- 
port restrictions in Italy have been eased somewhat, and larger takings of 
foreign wool by that country are expected as a result of rising exports of 
wool textiles and a somewhat larger import allotment for the domestic market 
in 1336-37. TJool supplies iii C-ermany continue much reduced, and occupation 
of the mills, which are obliged to use increasing amounts of substitute 
materials, has been somewhat curtailed. The use of artificial, fiber in the 
wool industry is ass^Jniing important proportions in both TreiTaany and Italy. 



MILLING OF WHEAT IN BONB AGAI".: rERiaTTED IN FRANCE ^/ 

A m.odified system of milling wheat in bond was est Mished in France 
by a decree of October 29, 1936. This replaces the mill:.i-g-in-bond regime 
existing under the old temporary-adm.ission system which v/t.s abolished by 
the law of August 15, 1936. b/ "Under that system, millers or grain dealers 

a/ Based on a report by Assistant Agricultural Attache L. P. Mallory, Paris, 
h/ See article on the French National V/heat Board in "Foreign Crops and 
Markets", November 2, 1936. 



DJovemlDer 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Imrkets 



659 



iviILLIKG OF Wn£Al IN BO^D AGAIN PFRivilTTED IN JRI^s^CE, CONT'D 

importing foreign wheat deposited y/ith the custonis a "bond equivalent 
in Talue to the tariff dutv. This bond was returned to them on the 
exportation of a Bj)ecified quantity of domestic grain or grain by-products. 
Up to November 1930, the amount of grain products the French dealer was re- 
quired to e^qport had been less than he was able to obtain from the imported 
wheat, thereby permitting a net import of wheat into France. Although the 
law of December 1, 1929, made provisions for the tightening of this milling- 
in-bond regime to adjust imports to export?: it was not until November 1930 
that further regulc.tions were issu.ed to. mal:e these provisions more effective. 
After that date importers of grain were compelled, ijnder threat of penalty 
to export the total ajnount of products derived from the imported product or 
an equiva,lent quantity derived from, domestic grain. Tliis system continued 
until the middle of Aug-ust 1936 when the nev; v/heat law establishing the 
National Wheat Eoard was enacted. Under pressure from the wheat trade, it 
was decided to abolish the old mil ling- in-bond system and establish a 
modified system, as foreseen in the law. The decree of October 29, 1936, 
T/hich established the new regime, was further imiplemented by four m.inisterial 
orders of November 5, 1956. The gist of the new system is contained in the 
first article of the decree of October 29, 1936, which reads as follov/s: 

"As an exceptional measure, millers and semiolina manufacturers ma,y 
be authorized to im.port foreign whes.t under the conditions of the present 
decree and after having paid the customs duties and taxes levied, in com- 
pensation of prior export, either of wheat or other domestic grains or flours 
and farinaceous products of wheat, 

"Prior export authorizations will only be granted up to July 31, 1937. 

"These operations are ma.de for the account of the Fneat Office by 
application of the provision in e.rticle 16 of the law of August 15, 1936." 

Briefly, the miller who desires to import foreign grain v/ill first 
have to export domestic wheat, flour, or v/heat by-products in quantities 
considered by the authorities to be equivalent to the amount of v/heat to be 
imported. In other words, authorization to import Cc-rxnot be obtained until 
the necessary documents proving previous exports of the required wheat or 
wheat equivalents are presertod. On receiving the foreign wheat, the miller 
must pay the usual customs duty and sucV: oihev taxes a.s are provided. In 
return for having exported his produc~-G .at v/orld market prices, the National 
Wheat Board grants him a drawback which was fixed on November 7, 1936, at 
approximately the amount of the customs duty. 

In order to avoid any frauds or abuses vmich may result from, the 
excha.nge of domestic grain products against the imported grain, types of 
compensation transactions are to be extablished. For the present the follow- 
ing types of transactions which were in affect prior to the passa.ge of the 
law of August 15, 1936, may be utilized. 



660 I'oreign Crops and Markets 7oi. 33, . 22 

MILLING OF WHEAT IN BOND AGAIN PEHvlITTED IN FRAI^TGE, CONT'D ^ 
Prod ucts or coni liina tions which migs t pe export ed pri or to iinp ortr^tion 
For every 100 kilos of grain imported: 
127 kilos of French whert 

100 kilos of a corahination of "bread-wheat flour, low-grade flour, and bra 
100 kilos of s. combination of middlings, low-grade flour, and bran 
96.5 kilos of a combination of ship-biscuit, low-grade flour, and bran 
98 kilos of products from dunm wheat made up of semolina, bran, and 

low-grade flours 
So kilos of duram paste and bran 

For the application of the new system of milling in bond, France is 
divided into customs zones. T/hile this zoning system may facilitate admin- 
istrative work, it will in som.e cases make the import-export operations dif- 
ficult as imports must enter through the same customs zone from which the 
offsetting exports took place. Moreover, upon importation the grain must go 
directly to the mill for milling, and any direct or indirect sale of wheat 
imported in compensation for p-rior export is forbidden. 

It is interesting to note that the establishment of the system of 
prior exportation as a measure of milling in bond is, in effect, an extension 
of the quota regime. Thus, the decree of October 29, 1936, states that 
millers who previously operated -jjider milling-in-bond provisions and who dur- 
ing the 3 years 1933, 1934, and 1935 imported more than 1,500 quintals (5,511 
bushels) of foreign grain, or more than 1,000 quintals (3,674 bushels) in the 
2 years 1934 and 1935, or more than 500 quintals (1,837 bushels) in 1935, may 
not export wheat with a view to later imiportation of foreign grain. An order 
of November 7, 1936, provides that a quarterly average will be established 
for the quantity of bread r-nd durum whea.t imported under the old regime of 
temporary adiEission by those who imported more then the quantities mentioned 
above. The maximum authorization for prior exports of products ma.y not ex- 
ceed the quarterly average so calculated, '/iillers who did not im.port up to 
the quantities mentioned above o.re authorized to carry out prior export 
operations of either wheat or flour in order later to import foreign wheat. 
The export ruthorizations granted for erch quarter may not exceed 10 percent 
of the total qu^-^ntities of wheat groTJud during the preceding quarter. 

For all foreign grain to be imported ^onder this system the import per- 
mits will be delivered only up to July 1937 and may not exceed 800,000 quintals 
of bread wheat. For both the millers who may export products on the basis 
of their past operation under temporary admission and those who may export 
wheat or wheat products in order to import grain in relation to the amo^ant 
of wheat they grind, a quota arrangement exists, based on past performance. 
According to the present quota, millers who previously worked under the milling- 
in-bond arrangements have their activity limited to a fixed amount and are 
■onable to expand. For the others, possibilities of doing business are 
governed by the changes in the quarterly quotas fixed by the Government. 



November 3u, 1936 



i^'oreign Crops and Markets 



661 



UlV I TED STATji^S aGFJ CULTURAL ilEEXPORTS, 1955-36 

Reexports of agricultural products from the United States comprise 
such foreign agricultural products as are imported into the United States, 
ostensihly for use here, and are suhseQuently exported in the same condition 
as that in wxiich they v.-ere imported. After a marked and s,lmost continuous 
decline since 1928,. these reexports took a slight upward turn in 1935-35, 
reaching , a total value of $22,474,000, tne highest since 1931-52 and repre- 
senting 59 percent of all reexported merchandise. The most im.portant single 
itemxS in this classification were raw silk, crude ruhher, tang oil, and 
sisal, the hulk of which goes to Canada. A large volume of ha.nanas also 
T/ent to Canada., "bristles and hides and skins to the United Kingdom and 
Canada., cacao oeans to Japan and Colombia, cotton and wool to the United 
Kingdom, and coffee and leaf tobacco to continental Europe. 



UillTSD ST-tTES: Value ,of agricultural reexports (foreign inerchandise) 

compa-red with total, 1920-1936 







Agr icultur 


al excluding 




Year ended 


Total 


forest oroducts 


Korest 


June 30 


reexports 




percent 


products 






Value 


of total 










reexport s 






Thousand 


Thousand 




Thousand 




dollars 


dollars 


Percent 


.dollars_ 


1920 


159,680 


128,191 


80.3 


5,380 


1921 


130,626 


90 , 739 


69.5 


4,043 


1922 


71,247 


43,589 


61. 2 


2,315 


1923 


70,051 


45,395 


69 . 1 


1,955 


1924 


87,683 


62,719 


71.5 


1,563 


1925 


86,426 


64,168 


74.2 


1,290 


1926 


100,234 


75,162 


75,0 


1,450 


1927 


100,753 


72,222 


71.7 , 


1 ,365 


1928 


103, 758 


. 73,391 


70.7 


1,528 


1929 


89,518 ■ 


63,942 


71.4 


2,157 


1930 


75 , 895 


50,670 


66.8 


1,382 


1931 


51,873 


28,791 


55.5 


858 


1932 


40,248 


22,692 


56.4 


409 


1933 


26 , 936 


14,763 


54.8 


297 


1934 


33,256 


21,228 


63.9 


400 


1935 


35,767 


20,262 


55.6 


. 367 


1936 prelimin£,ry . , . 


38,309 


22,474 


56.7 


528 



Compiled from i.ionthly Smimary of i'oreign Commerce of the United States, 
June issues, 1921-1926, January and June issues, 1927-1935, and official 
records of the Bureau of Foreign and domestic Commerce. 

a/ Includes only specified forest products. See annual table beginning 
on following pa,ge. 



662 



I'd reign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, II0.22 



AGRICUM'UEIL MD FO}?EST PEDDUCTS: Eeoxports (foreign merchandise) 
from the Iinited States, 1934-35 and 1935^36 







Year ended J-ane 30 


ooiBiiiodity reexported 


Unit 


'quantity 


Value 








1935-36 




1935-36 






1934-35 


p TQ 1 im . 


1934-35 


prelim . 


ANIMALS AFJj MlIviAL PPODUCTS* 








1 000 


1 000 


Animals , live < 




mo usanci s 


mo LiscxiitLS 


O.U -LXclX S 




Editle : 




a/ 


a/ 


a/ 


3 






b/ 


b/ 


4 


g 


Tots-l aniinals live ' 










12 


"Hrii TV T) "TO m p t ^5 ' ' 

t 4" t 0 "V ' 


Jju . 


440 


3 ,024 


72 


517 




T "h 

JjD # 


138 


116 


29 


25 


Milk 0 ond pr!<?pr1- arirl pvanorp, t orl ' 
Total dait^y products. ■ 


L'b. 


470 


475 


169 


181 


L"b . 


1 , 048 


3 , 615 


270 


723 


EfijfSjs and e Tji-odnct s i • 












Effp* alhiimpn . ■ 


Lh. 


23 


67 


13 


38 


Eggs, frozen, dried or canned '• 


Lh. 


59 


60 


8 


12 


Total eggs & egg products. • . I 
Hides & skir'^ tpiw (GTCG'nt, fiiTs)*' 


L"b. 


•92 


127 


21 


50 












Cattle hides- ; 












Drv . . ' 


Lh - 


1 , 135 


2,567 


120 


389 


Wet ■ 


'Lb. 




Off 


XX 0 


Q7 


G-Ont <-nifi Iri ri c,Vi n . . . • 


Lh. 




~\ f^ "? 
± 


DiJ 




Kip and calf skins- ' ■ 














Lb. 


38 


123 


11 


17 


Wet . . ' 


Lh. 


112 


193 


20 


36 


She eTi PTic] \pv']'h t^Vin^ — 












Drv .... ' 


Lh. 


53 


204 


XU 


A T 
'iO 


Wet . 


Lb. 


460 


286 


1-0 


D'i 




Lb. 






77 


D 




Lb . 








ox 


Meats and meat Droducts: '• 












T "U 

Lb . 


5 


101 




5 




Lb . 


0 


.a/ 


0 


- / 
a/ 




Lb. 
Lb. 


30 


161 

Do 


5 

A 


28 
9 




T "K 

LD . 


61 


0<o4t 


XU 






JjD . 


83 


105 


120 


98 


Oils and fats, animal: 












Animal "fpt, ^ aTir? nil^ pHiTilp • 


T,b 


1 


29 


a/ 


2 


Animal oils, fats and ■ 


Lb. 


238 


1,380 


14 


70 




Lb. 


239 


1,409 


14 


72 


Total meats, meat products, 














Lb. 


383 


1,838 


144 


212 




Lb. 


3,186 


2,812 


4,399 


4,955 



Continued - 



November 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



663 



AGRICULTURAL AND TOREST PRODUCTS: Reexports (foreign merchandise) 
fron the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Cor.iiTiodity reexported 



;Unit 



Year ended Jiine 30 



(Quantity 







1935-36 




1935-36 




1934—35 


pre lin . 


1934-30 


prelim. 








1,000 


1 ,000 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


L"b. 


77 


77 


16 


19 


Ld . 


O c 




33 




Lb . 


T r? 

1 , 377 


i , 402 




369 


Ld . 


oo9 




C A 




L"b. 


2 , 049 


1 , 9 52 


386 


519 


Lb. 


456 


439 


540 


594 


Lb. 


166 


178 


33 


55 




H 


■ H 


8 


20 




b/ 


b/ 


64 


41 








6,362 


7 ,952 


Lb. 


9 ,794 


13,593 


593 


816 


Lb. 


714 


118 


38 


, 8 


Lb. 


9,836 


7,257 


1,130 


724 


Bale 


7 


11 


504 


687 


Bunch 


223 


348 


370 


573 


Lb. 


1,798 


1 , 216 


60 


46 


Lb. 


93 


143 


8 


11 


Lb. 


154 


129 


13 


13 


Box 


a/ 


a/ 


1 


1 


Gal. 


141 


27 


68 


17 


Box 


12 


14 


24 


24 


Lb. 


351 


553 


18 


33 








562 


718 


Lb. 


3,831 


2,201 


126 


74 


Lb. 


237 


33 


2 


1 


3u. 


184 


330 


161 


254 


Bbl. 


a/ 


1 


2 


2 




^— 


b/ 


187 


95 








478 


426 


Lb. 


25 


108' 


4 


25 


Lb. 


416 


607 


39 


73 


Lb. 


244 


6 


16 


1 


Lb. 


1 


2 


a/ 


a/ 


Lb, 


228 


447 


31 


83 


Lb. 


2B5 


319 


42 


34 


Lb. 


1 -1 GO 


1,489 


132 


216 



NIMALS MD Aim-iAL PROD., CONT'D: 
bol, unmanufactured : 

Carpet wool 

Clothing wool 

Combing wool 

Hair, Angora, Cashmere, etc..., 

Total wool, ^unmanufactured... 
iscellaneous animal loroduct s : 

Bristles 

Hair, unmanufactured 

Other animal prod. , edible 

Other animal prod. , inedible. . . 
Total animals & animal prod. 
EGETABLE PRODUCTS: 

ocoa beans 

ocoa and chocolate 

of fee 

otton, unmfd. (478 lb. ) 

ruits and preparations : 

Bananas 

Dates 

I'igs 

Grapes 

Lemons 

Olives 

Pineapples 

Other fruits, fresh, etc 

Total fr^aits 6; preparations. 
rains and grain product s : 

Rice- 
Cleaned 

Uncleaned 

Wheat (so lb. ) 

Waeat flour 

Other grains &. preparations.. . 
Total grains preparations, 
[uts ; 

Almonds, svreet , 

Brazil or cream 

Pilberts 

Peanuts 

Walnuts 

Other nuts, edible , 

Total nuts 



Continued 



664 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 22 



AGEICUL?UML illD FOREST PRODUCTS: Reexports (foreign merchandise) 
from the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd , 







I ear ended June 30 


Commodity reexported 


Unit 


Quant i ty 


■y alue 




. 1935-36 




1935-36 






1934-35 


; prolim. 


1934-35 


prelim. 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, CONT'D: 








1,000 


1,000 


Oilseeds and oilseed -products: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Oilseeds- 














Lb. 


11,0S& 


; 8,891 
' 7,188 


215 


245 




Lb. 


265 


7 


226 




Lb. 


11 , 353 


16,079 


222 


471 


Copra oil-cake, residue?, etc. .. 


Lb. 


. 41 


3,900 


1 


90 


Oils- 












Expressed- 












Cnpofl "hntt, p-p 


Lb. 


71 


40 


9 , 


4 




Lb . 


2,716 


3 , 155 


80 


130 




Lb. 


55 


368 


10 


35 


Pa.lm and palm kernel oil. . 


Lb. 


10,892 


6,289 


442 


298 




Lb. 


503 


685 


32 


39 


^ 1 r r> o o r\~i 1 


JJ U . 


78 


368 


3 


17 


THt n i^'' nil 




4,925, 


5,965 


484 


945 


Other ex« , oils and f ats. . 


Lb 
Lb. 


1,186 
2,103 


1 ,243 
3 , 141 


258 
125 


377 
181 


±U 0 ct J, U J, X o oJ-iLl. X d b Id , 












Lb. 


22 . 529 


21,254 


1.443 


2,026 


Essentia.! and distilled- 










TiPTPOTi nil 


j-J u • 


2 


3 


2 


5 


Other e ^^^pntinl rl i c;t, - 


Lb. 


150 


171 


162 


137 


Total essential or dist. 


Lb. 


152 


174 


164 


142 


Tota.l vegetalDle oils. . 


Lb. 


22,681 


21,428 


1,607 


2,168 


Rubber a.nd similar gums: 














Lb. 
Lb. 


209 
0 


190 


59 


46 


Guayul e 


1 


0 


a/ 


Gutta-percha, rubber 












substitutes and c-nran. 


Lb 


-31 


93 


5 


8 




Lb . 


37,369 


26,562 


4 , 612 


3,846 


T'ol'J^n *m "1 Vi £Zi o +• r» 


ij U . 


37,609 


26,846 


4,676 


3,900 


Seeds, except oilseeds: 












Clover 


J-J u • 


7 


' 42 


1 


3 


Vegetable and flower seeds.... 


Lb. 


356 


152 


23 


15 


Other seeds, including grass.. 


Lb. 


962 


1 , 124 


47 


55 


Total seeds, except oilseeds 


Lb. 


1,325 


1,318 


71 


73 


Spice^: 














Lb. 


638 


655 


77 


91 




Lb. 


231 


■ ■ ■ 306 


14 


17 




Lb. 


164 


179 


20 


25 




Lb. 


27 


■ a/ ■ • 


1 


a/ 




Lb. 


195 


143 


26 


20 



Continued - 



NoyemlDer 30, 193 6 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



665 



AGRICULTUBii AWD FOPEST PSODUCTS: Reexp.orts (foreign raerchandi se) 



fror.i the United Stotes, 


1934-35 ar. 


d 1935-35, 


cent 


'd 










Year ended June 


30 






TTni t. • 

O IIX u 


Qup.nt i ty 




y.T.lue 








T Q "2 R ^ ^ 

iyo5-ob 






ly oO-ob 






1934-35 


preli::i . 


1934 


-35 


prelin. 


7EG-ETA3LR P"R01";TTnT'=; HClivIT'ilV 








1, 


000 


1 , 000 


Spices, continued: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 




T 1^ 
J-iD . 


943 


1 , 309 




91 


9 4 




T Vi ' 
Jj U . 1 


48 


48 




89 


86 


( 1 T Vi CT^ T r> O C* 




h/ 


\/ 




62 


82 










380 


'Ho 




Ton 


a/ 


a/ 




3 


4 




Jj u • 


815 


1 , 413 




212 


249 


['oliac CO , unmanuf ac ture d : 
















Lh. 


O O 

297 


225 




328 


olb 


0 the r 1 e af . 


Lh. 




'Z'T.O 




153 


<:^U J. 


-L v> U C^_L. L* OjW 'w* ^ j LiJ-AniX H. ••••••• 


Lb. 


567 


564 


481 


51 / 


/prrp-f-'a'W'] pc; j^yirl "H "pPTt T*5^ "1*. "1 nri o « 














Dried and fresh- 
















Tib 


/ one 






132 


X b 




Lb. 


3,128 


3,938 




150 






-U u . 


1 


3 




1 


2 




JJ u . 




11 




1 


a / 
a/ 




-K / 






10 


"1 1 
i X 


X cii xiid.ceous STJ. u s 0 d-i i c e s 


T "h 


889 


768 




31 


D C 
c, n 




XJ u • 


11 


ly 




1 




Pickles, sauces and relishes. • . 


Jj D . 


J. ^ 


loo 




2 


lo 


wi/iit-x VtJg, t; Ij ciU Le b dAiU. px up , < . . • • 

iu L>ci± vcgei/d,Dxes cx prep. .... 




b/ 


d/ 




40 


46 








368 


456 


^liscellaneous vegetahle products: 














Dnigs, herhs, leaves, roots, etc 


. Lb. 


9 69 


883 




209 


190 


i!iDers, vegetahle- (2,240 Ih,) 




a/ 


o / 

a/ 










Tl ^ >n 

i on 




19 


ID 




-Lon 


a/ 


a/ 




32 


83 




± on 


a/ 


a/ 




23 


15 




Ton 


a'/ 
a/ 


a/ 
2:/ 




30 


1 




ion 


a/ 


a/ 




56 


49 


Manila or abaca 


Ton 


4 


2 




324 


233 




Ton 


6 


11 




453 


898 




Ton 


3 


, 




31 


18 




Ton 


13 


13 


958 


1 , 512 




No. 


27 


362 




2 


11 


Vegeta-hle iTory or tag^aa nuts 


Lb. 


4,150 


5,524 




81 


117 


Other veg. food prod. & hev. . . 




• ^/ 


b/ 




99 6 


839 


Other inedihle veg. products. 
Total vegetable products. . . . 




^/ 


b/ 




195 


115 








13. 


90 j 


1'1,522 


Total agricultural products. 








20, 


n a V5 


22 , 474 



Continued - 



666 Foreign Crops and Markets ■ Vol. 33, Ko.22 

AGRICULTUEAL MW YOK^ST PHODUCTS: Heoi^r.orts (foreign nerchandiso) 
fror.i the United States, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Year ended June 30 







lear enaea june ou 
(Quantity ; Value 








1S35-36 




1935-36 






1934-35 


prelim . 


1934-35 


prelim. 


FOHEST PRODUCT'S: 








1 , 000 


1 , 000 


Dyeine; and tanning materials: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 
















T'nn 


1 


1 


39 


38 


QuelDracho extract 


Lh. 


336- 


1 , 535 


15 


58 




L"b. 


656 • 


3,067 


50 


112 












84 


208 














Camphor, natural and synthetic 


Lh. 


20 


23 


o 


g 




T 'K 
Jj D . 


2 


50 


1 ■ 


9 


Varnish gioms and resins- 










L"b. 


101 


100 


27 


20 


Other varnish gums & resins. 


Lh. 


269 


369 


28 


31 


/■\ i. _ ^. _ . _ j_ 


L"b. 


687 


685 


109 


120 


m -i. 4- T _ ■ _ I 


Lh. 


'1 ,079 


1,227 


174 


189 


Vi/ 0 0 0. . 












Boards, planks, & scantlings- 




a/ 










M.ft. 


a/ 


13 


41 


Hardwood, except cahinet.... 


M . f t . 


a/ 


a/ 


8 


4 






aJ 


a/ 


2 


1 




IV: .ft. 


tl 


a/ 


60 


68 


Other logs and timher 


M.ft. 




■ !'/ 


10 


1 












rr 
L) 










98 


120 


ffiiscellaneous forest products: 












Wood pulp, sulphite (2,240 Ih.) 


Ton 


a/ 




5 


0 


Other wood pulp " 


Ton 


a/ 


a/ 


a/ 


1 


Cork, wood, or hark., urmfd. . , 


Lh. 


6 


56 


1 


6 




Lh. 


38 


39 


5 


4 


TOTAL SPECIFIED EOHEST PRODUCTS. 








367 


528 


AGRICULTURAL - 




















6,362 


7,952 










13.900 


14,522 


TOTAL AGRICULTURAL REEXPORTS 








20,262 ; 


22,474 


TOTAL REEXPORTS, AL.L COMMODITIES 








35,767 ; 


38 , 309 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. 

a/ Less than 500. 

h/ Reported in value only. 



November 30 , 1936 



Foreign Croios e.ncL Markets 



o67 



UIHT^D STATES A&x J GULTUBAL tSjJDE „ ITE TERRITOHISS 

The e:q^cort aiid import statistics of the United Stai.es do not in- 
clude the trade of continental united States with Hawaii, Puerto iiico, 
Alaska, nor, since January 1, 1955, the Virgin Islands. 

In 1935-36, shipments of agricultural products from continental 
United Sta.tes to H.awe.ii, Paerto Eico, and Alaska, v/ere valued at $54-, 7, 000, 
4S percent oi which went to Puerto Eico, ,36 percent to Hawaii, and 15 per- 
cent to Alaska. Paring this same period United States exports of farm 
products to foreign countries v/ere valued at .$766,304,000 

Earm products shipped to the United States from these three terri- 
tories had a total value of $185,880,000 in 1935-30, the highest since 
1927-28. These shipments m?,y he considered supplementary to United Spates 
imports of agricultural products which were valued at $1,139,949,000 in 
1955-36. Hav/aii supplied f^^ccut 59 percent of this total and Puerto Eico 
40 percent. A la.rge pa.rt of the gain \/as due to the higher value of sugar 
"brought from Puerto Pico and Hawaii. 

Hawaii 

During the year ended June 30, 1935, fc.rin products purchased from 
the United St.;.tes hy Hawaii were valued a.z $19,446,000, the highest in 
more than a decade. Eice. whiich £Lmounti;d to 83,348,000 pounds v;ith a 
value of $3,657,000, ranked first in importance, and wheat flour ranked 
second with a value of $1,037,000. Purchases of "beef and butter were 
valued at $1,081,000 and $1,000,000, respectively. Hawaii was also an 
outlet for a considerable volume of canned milk, fresh, cured, and cajmed 
pork, fresh apples, oranges, canned fruit, fresh and canned vegeta.bles, 

pota.toes, cooking fa,ts, drt;ssed poultiy, and eggs, all of ••./hich sho\;ed a 
gain over 1934-35. 

In 19 35-36 farm products shipped to 'the United States from Hav/aai 
\7ere valued at $110,605,000, a high post-v.'ar record. Sugar represented 60 
percent of the total shipm.ents to the United Ste,tes. Shipments of sug-ar 
totaled 979,000 short tons valued at $66,624,000, e:;ceeding that of the 2 
preceding years both in quantity a,nd value. Canned pineapple was second 
in importance, amounting to 515,751,000 pounds valued at $33,494,000, or 
30 percent of the total, the highest in point of volume since 1931-32. The 
grov/ing demand for pineapple juice is evidenced by the fact that these ship- 
ments, which ajuounted to 27,000 po^unds in 1933-34 and to 42,356,000 pounds 
in 1934-35, had increased to 156,142,000 pounds by 1935-36. 

Paer to Eico 

Shipments to Puerto Eico from continerital United States in 1935-36 
had a value of $25,518,000, exceeding tha,t of each of the 6 preceding years. 



668 



foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, ITo. 22 



"UllITED STATZS AGRICLlLTUIl.iL TRADE i'7ITiI TERRITORIES, COUT'D 

United States sends large volumes of rice to paerto Rico, the total amount- 
ing to 216,400,000 pound? during 1935-36 with a value of $9,009,000, a de- 
creo.se in volume tut, ..ause - of higher prices, a. considera"ble gain in value 
over the sliipments last season. Puerto Rico purchased 388,000 barrels of 
flour valued at $2,210,000, a gain over 1934-35. Shipments of dried heons 
araOunted to 29,406,000 pounds, also a g-'in over 1934-35. The pickled pork 
shipped to Puerto Rico in 1935-36 was va]uLcd at $1,260,000 and cured pork 
at $1,133,000, representing a small increase in value over the preceding 
year. Other items purchased in consideraole volume are idl kinds of dairy 
products, lard, canned me -.ts, oleomargarine, canned fruits, cornmeal, "bis- 
cuits and crackers, coconut oil, leaf tobacco, onions, potatoes, canned 
vegetables, and beverages, excluding distilled liquors. 

larm products shipped from Puerto Rico to continental United States 
in 1935^36 were valued at $75,185,000, the highest since 1929-30. Sugar, 
which amoimted to 839,000 tons valued at $60,303,000, raade up 30 percent 
of this total, leaf tobacco 12 percent, molasses and fresh pineapple ap- 
proximately 2 percent each. The volume; of sugar sent to the United States 
was exceeded in only one other 3^ear, 1931-32. The volume of leaf tobacco 
shipped to the United States amounted to 13,616,000 pounds valued at 
$8 J 677,000, the largest since 1930-31. 

Alaska 

In 1955-36 shipments to Ala,ska from continental United States were 
valued at $8,293,000, apeak figure for the post-war period. Beverages 
and fruit juices, exclusive of distilled liquors, constituted the most 
important single item and were valued at J^l , 779 , 000 . This was a. slight 
decline in value when compared Y/ith a year ago, but these shipments were 
made at lower prices and represented a gain in vol"'Jjne . The remainder of 
the shipments were made vp largely of butter, fresh beef and veal, canned 
goods of all kinds, fresh and cured po:.k, wheat flour, and white potatoes. 
Uith the exception of canned milk and flour, such shipments exceeded those 
of a year ago in both volume and value. 

Shipments of agricultural products to the Urdted States from Alaska 
are insignificant. The total value of these shipments in 1935-36 stood 
at $90,000 and consisted of reindeer meat and hides, wool, and a few live 
animal s . 

Virgir, Islands of the United States 

Trade between the United States and the Virgin Islands is compara- 
tively unimportant . Purchases of farm products from the United States by 
these Islands in 1935-36 stood at $425,000, consisting largely of dairy 
products, beef, wheat flour, cornmeal, rice, and beverages, excluding 
distilled liquors. 



llovemlDer 30, 1936 Toreign Crops and Markets ' ' 669 

miTSD STATES AC-HI CULTURAL TRADE WITH TERRITORIES, CONT'D 

In 1935-35 the tota]. value of farm products shipped from the Virgin 
Islands to the United States amounted to $242,000. Sugar and live cattle 
represented the hulk of these shipments, "being valued at $178,000, and 
$51,000, respectively. 

Detailed statistics showing the shipments of agricultural prodv.cts 
from the United States to Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Alaska, and the Virgin 
Islands, and from these territories to continental United States are given 
in the tahles on pages 670 to 690, inclusive. 

AGRICULTURAL TRADE: Value of shipments between continental United States 
and non-contigaous territories, 1923-1936 a/ 



Shipments excluding forest, p roduct s 



I ear 
ended 
June 30 


To the United States from 


Erom the United States to 


Ha.waii 


Faerto 
Rico 


Alaska 


Virgin b/ 
I slonds 


Hawaii 


Puerto 
Rico 


Alaska 


Virgin b/ 
Islands 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,0C'0" ■ 


1,000" ■ 


1-, 000 


1,000 




dollars 


dollars 


dollars 


dollars 


dollars 


dollars 


dollars 


dollars 


1923 . . . 


93,313 


61,767 


72 




12,632 


• 22,261 


• 7,101 




1924 . . . 


104,267 


66,454 


215 




13,558 


25,929" 


■ 7,537- 




1925 . . . 


97,429 


69,954 


254 




14-, 576 


27,527- 


■ 8,175 




1925 . . . 


105,467 


70,645 


374 




14,739 


29,493 


3,188 




1927 . . . 


98,577 


83,903 


307 




15,216 


29,497 


7,378 




1923 . . . 


110,317 


81,993 


126 




15,359 


25,723 


■ 8, 217 




1929 . . . 


103,641 


53,005 


205 




16,289 


28 , 559 


7,912 




1950 . . . 


98,069 


75,484 


325 




17,372- 


26,378 


S , 277 




1931 . . . 


102,919 


75,033 


280 




15,870 


23, 695 


6,565 




1332 . . . 


92,189 


67,481 


114 




14,430 


17, 635- 


5 , 307 




1333 . . . 


79 , 739 


58 , 628 


31 




11,593 


16,317 


4 , 531 




195^1 . . . 


86,775 


65,770 


87 




14,945 


■ 19,138 


b , od o 


c/ 156 


1935 . . . 


91,460 


60,027 


137 


c/ 88 


17,311 


22 , 619 




1936 d/ 


110,605 


75,185 


90 


242 


19,446 


25,518 


8 , 293 

u— — .— — 


425 



Compiled froiE Mcnfchly Suffffiary Qt foreign. Coiam<^rG'® of mit&d States, Jun« 
issjaes, and officicd recQr^s of the bureau of Jcrei^^ and Dci^estic Corrj:ierce 
a/ Excludes distilled liquors, dene.tured aiid ethyl alcohol, pineapple al- 
cohol, bay rum, and citric acid which are classified as non-as^icultural . 
b/ Reported as a foreign country prior to January 1, 1935. 
c/ January 1 - June 30. 
d/ Preliminary. 



670 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 22 



AGEICULTUP.AL PRODUCTS: Shipments to the United States from Hawaii, 

1934-35 and 1935-36 







Year ended J^'one 30 


\j\Jij.u.ii\J 1. u.y i J. M C ^-L 




Q;aan 


tity 


Va lue 


1934-35 


1935-36 
prelim. 


. 1954-35 


1935-36 
. prelim. 


ANHv;AL AMD ANIkAL PRODUCTS: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


• 1,000 
: dollars 


• 1,000 
dollars 




No. 


a/ 




2 


14 




LTD. 


A r 

40 


"1 O 

18 


6 


, 4 


Bones, hoofs, horns, etc 


Lb. 


183 


A 

4 


3 


: a/ 




Lb. 


1 , bob 


i , 4(J2 


: 114 


; 124 




Lb. 


1,35d 


736 


: 63 


: 54 




Lb. 


470 


556 


; 26 


; 40 




Lb. 


163 


141 


; 42 


39 


Total animals 8c animal prod. 








: 256 


• 255 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS: 














Lb. 


4, 747 


5, 713 


545 


: 639 


Fruits and preparations: 














Bunch 


95 


116 


. 93 


; 114 


Pineapples- 














Box 


44 


68 


74 


• 145 




Lb. 


464, 555 


515, 751 


30, 534 


; 33 , 494 




Lb. 


42 ,356 


156, 142 


2,315 


8,511 




Lb. 


109 


66 


11 


: 7 


Other prepared or preser-zed . . 












fruits incl. fruit juices ... 


Lb. 


39 


57 


9 


: 15 




Lb. 


380 


221 


21 


14 




Lb. 


76 


60 


5 


6 


_SllS.ar and molasses: 














Gal. 


24, 779 


23,651 


573 


570 


Sugar- (2, 000 pound) 














Ton 


15 


14 




T /I /I T 
J- , ft'i-L 










55,524 


65,183 


V t;i^;eTiaD-Les . 






Lb. 


ood 


2 , ii.'' 


33 


98 




Lb. 


578 


630 


26 


32 




Lb. 


3,548 ' 


5,866 


34 


51 






w 


b/__ 


6 


30 


Total vegetable products cj . . . 








91,204 


__liq,_350_ 


TOTAL AGRICULTURAL SHIPI'miTS c/ . 








91,460 


110 , 605 


TOTAL SHIPMENTS (liAlAIIAl'j 












PRODUCTS) ALL COi-lMODITIES ' 








92,835 : 


111,975 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. 

a/ Less than 500. 

b/ Reported in value only. 

c/ Excludes distilled liquors. 



November 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



671 ■ 



AGRICULTUR./IL AilD F02EST PEODUCTS: Shipments from the United States to Hawaii, 

1934-35 and 1935-36 ay' 



Commodity shipped 



INIMALS MB ANE^AL PRODUCTS: 
Inimals, live 

iairx-ji2:o.!iiiiLt£_L 

B-atter 

Cheese 

Milk and creaTi- 

Presh and sterilized ... 
Condensed, sweetened ... 
Evaporated, "onsweetened 
Powdered, dried- 
Skimmed 

Whole 

Infants' foods, etc. . 
Total dairy products 
]ggG in the shell 

fegs & yolks, frozen, dried, etc. 
'eats and mp.Dt p rorlucts' 
Meats- 
Beef and veal- 

Presh or frozen 

Pickled or cured 

Canned, incl. corned, etc 
Total heef and veal . 

Mutton and lamh 

Po rk- 

Carcasses J fresh or frozen 
Loins and other fresh 
Bacon 

Hams and shoulders . . 
Sides, Cu^iih. & Wiltshire 
Pickled, salted, etc . . 

Canned pork 

Total 

Poultry and ijame, fresh . 
Sausagc- 

Canned 

ITot canned 

Other meats, fresh, cured 

Other mieats, canned 

Total meats 

Meat ezt. & "bouillon cuhes 
Sausage casings 



Yea r en ded June 30 



Tin -i f 




; 1955-36 










: 1935-36 




: 1934-35 


: prelim. 


; 1934r-35 


• rirelim. 








; 1,000 


; 1,000 




; Thousands 


: Thousands 


' dollars 


; dollars 




i y 


: W 


1 101 


i 128 


Lb. 


\ 2, 830 


; 3,23L 


; 832 


; 1,000 


Lh. 


i 696 


i 777 


: 130 


: 158 


Gal. 


; 15 


; 5 


; 12 


: 6 


Lb. 


' , 477 


: 442 


: 53 


: 46 


Lb. 


; 10,125 


: 11,503 


i 635 


: , 763 


Lb. 


363 


1 438 


: 24 


; 35 


T,b 






: 1 


; 1 


Tib 


1 

, -1- o r ; 


■ ?1? 












: 1,737 


• 2,065 


Doz. 


2 ,205 


1, 950 


542 


: 521 


Lb. 


120 


159 


22 


: 35 


Lb. 


4,053 


5,402 


499 


844 


Lb. 


37 


20 


5 




Lb. 


1. 768 


1 /1-34 


246 




Lb. 


5. 858 


6 856 




1 081 


Lb. 


839 


972 


129 


ISO 


Lb. 


189 . 


18 


27 


3 


Lb . ; 


2,012 ; 


1 , 842 


311 


374 


Lb. : 


773 ■ 


664 


202 


220 




2 , 040 : 


1.631 . 


442 


472 


Lb. ; 


0 : 


27 : 


0 ; 


c/ 


Lb. ; 


157 : 


65 i 


22 : 


11 


Lb . ; 


"39 ; 


-23 ' 


142 ■ 


135 


ho . 


o, /lO 


4.643 : 


1.146 • 


1,215 


Lb. ; 


1,607. ; 


1,808 1 


362 ■; 


459 


Lb. j 


930 : 


823 ; 


212 :' 


154 


Lb. ; 


1,537 ; 


1 , 740 : 


250 ; 


314 


Lb. : 


359 ; 


342 : 


46 : 


49 


Lb. j 


551 : 


776 : 


97 : 


147 


Lb. 1 


17,401 ; 


17,965 : 


2,992 ; 


3.579 


Lb. : 


2 ; 


1 : 


1 : 


1 


Lb. ; 


9 ; 


16 i 


5 ; 


8 



Value 



Continued - 



572 



PoreiCT. GroDs and Markets 



Vol, 33, llo. 22 



AC-RI CULTLTRiili AjNTD F0HE3T PEO]jUCTS: Siiipments from the United States to Hawaii, 

1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Commoditv shipped 



Unit 



MliviALS & MIIv'iAL PROD, , COITT'3: : 
O ils and fats, anima l: ; 

Lard, excluding neutral ; Lb. 

Other oils and fats, animal ... : Lh. 
Total meats & meat products, ;' 

oils and fats ; Lh. 

Other animal products ; 

Total animals & animal prod. 
WaZI^ABlE PHOnJCTS: ^ ; 

Chocolate, incl. sweetened : Lh. 

Cocoa, powdered ; Lb. 

Coffee and substitutes : ;' 

G-reen ] Lb. 

Roasted ; Lb. 

Extracts & substitutes ; Lb. 

Cotton, unmfd. incl. linters(500 lb) : Bale 
Piu it s and preparations : | 

Presh- 

Apples ■ Box 

Citras- ; 

Grapefruit ; Box 

Lemons '■ Box 

Oranges [ Box 

G-rapes '■ Lb. 

peaches ; Lb. 

Pears : Lb. 

Other fresh fruits ; 

Total fresh fruits ; 

Dried and evaporated- ; 

Prone s '; Lb. 

Raicins ' Lb. 

Other dried & evap . f raits . ; Lb. 

Total dried & evapora^ted ■ Lb. 
Canned- ; 

Apples and apple sauce : Lb. 

Apricots ; Lb. 

Cherries I Lb. 

Peaches : Lb. 

PeajTs ; Lb . 

Pruits for salads ; Lb. 

■ Other c:;-r;n;:d fruits ■' Lb. 

Total ciL-ned fruits i Lb. 

Preserv'3d jellies r.nd jams .... : Lb. 

Other frj.it pr'-;T;ara,uions i Lb. 

Total fruits & frait prep. . ■ 



Year ended June 30 
Value 



1934-35 


— ,1 
, 1935-36 
; prelim. 


1934-35 


1935-36 
: prelim. 


Thousands 


;Thousands 


• 1 , J'jO 
dollars 


; 1,000 
■■ dollars 


185 
97 


203 
! 134 


'22 
12 


28 
14 


17,694 


: 18,319 


3,032 
47 


: 3,630 
; 65 






5,431 


: 6 , 444 


625 
110 


538 
93 


127 
17 


i 119 
: 11 


420 
497 
30 


566 
489 
29 
1 


47 
110 
10 
13 


42 
115 
11 

27 


117 


121 


165 


176 


18 
18 
165 
1 , 077 
189 
529 


18 
19 
175 
811 
239 
670 


41 
50 
411 
52 
10 
24 
61 


38 
81 
435 
43 
14 
29 
58 






824 


874 


407 
389 ; 
250._^ 


455 
419 
269 


26 
23 
27 


23 
21 
27 


1.056 


]. , 144 


— 1 

7 5 


71 


330 • 
187 • 
178 ' 

616 : 

341 ; 

96 : 

737 ; 


421 
171 
180 
657 
343 
80 
997 


15 

15 ; 

].4 
43 i 
26 ' 

11 ; 
55 J 


19 
12 

Ip 
42 
24 
9 
76 


2,435 . 


2,849 


179 


198 


734 ; 
320 ; 


697 
359 


72 : 
49 : 


75 
55 






1,200 • 


1,273 



Continued - 



November 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



673 



AGRICULTUEAl MID FOEEST PRODUCTS: Shipments from the United States to Hawaii, 

1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 

rear ended J-jne 30 



Commodity shipped 



VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, COl-TTimED 
Grains and grain products ; 
Grains- 
Barley (43 lb.) 

Corn (56 lb.) 

Oats (32 lb.) 

RicG- 

Paddy or rough 

Milled, including brown 

TJheat (60 lb . ) 

Meal and flour- 
Corn meal 

Catraeal, flaked sxid. 

rolled oats 

Rice screenings, broken 

rice, rice flour & meal 
TiTheat f lour- 

■JTholly of U.S. wheat. . . 
Other wheat flour. ..... 

Total grains and flours. 
Miscellaneous grain products- 
Biscuits and crackers- 
Sweetened 

Unsweetened 

Cereal foods- 
Corn, ready to eat 

TJheat- 

Ready to eat 

To be cooked 

Other cereal foods 

Macaroni , spaghetti , etc. . . . 
6ther grains & preparations 
; , iTotal miSiC. grain products 
ggeds mi ioA6.^ 3t 

la^ (2,^40 V^\) '\. 

'afi^ aiid mile '(^6 ik.) 

MUl feeds (2,246 lb.) - 

!B&r).ey, rolled fqr feed 

MixeS. dairy feed^. ... . . 1. . . 

Mixed poultry f ee^ i . . . 

Other prepared and mixed.. . 
Other feeds, incl. bran, etc 
Oil cake and meal (2,240 lb.) 
Total feeds and fodders f /, 



Unit 



Ton 
Bu. 

Ton 

Ton 
't'on 
^an 
Jon 



Qua-ntity 



1 


r 

I 




3 


13 


12 


1 


of 


23 


23 




i 


11 


l3 


1 


1 



318 

29 
993 

14 
318 

29 







1935-36 




1935-36 




1934-35 


prelim. 


1934-35 


prelim. 








1,000 


1,000 




Thousands 


Thousands 


; dollars 


dollars 


Bu. 


37 


53 


29 


32 


Bu. 


83 


110 


85 


99 


■Rn 


J- » J 




q 


1 1 
1. J. 


T "K 
IjD . 






a 
o 


t. 
o 


T "U 

Lb . 




O TOO 

do , loo 


O , 216 


3 , b r4 


Bu. 


DO . 


■ ... 66 


48 


50 


Bbl. 


1 


1 


4 


7 


Lb. 


575 • 


536 


33 


; 34 


Lb. 


529 


329 


10 


; 8 


Bbl. 


d/ 78 




d/ 524 




JDUl • 


e / ft 




e / oud 


• X , uo I 




e/ c/ 


c/ 


e/ c7 


'■ 1 








4 468 


■ 4,968 


Lb. 


567 


479 


101 


! 82 


Lb. 


222 


317 


36 


; 62 


Lb. 


105 


178 


12 


21 


Lb. 


451 


577 


40 


: 55 ■ 


Lb. ■ 


191 


167 


19 


17 


Lb. 


209 


262 


27 


35 


Lb. 


1,030 


1,030 


81 


61 




b/' 


b/ 


61 


, 5g_ 






i 37/ 


403 



Value 



1,723 



Continued - 



674 loreign Crops ard Markets Yol. 33, Ho. 22 

AGRICULTURAL >JvD j;0?jiST PRODUCTS: Shipments from the United States to Hawaii, 



15:54-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



ISOTimodity shipped 



YESETABLil PRODUCTS, oOLTILTJED: 
Hops 



Hut_s : 

pean-iits , . . 

pecans . . , . 

Walnuts . . . 

Other nuts 
Oi lseeds .... 
Oils and fats 



, v-.-;^etaole : 



Cottonseed oil 

Cooking fate, otner than lard 

Linseed oil 

Other vegetaole oils aJid fats 
Total vegets.Dle oils & fats 

Seeds (except oilseeds) 

Spice s 



Sugar, molasses cn.d sirup 

vegetables and preparations ; 
Yegetables- 

Dried and fresh- 
Beans, dried 

Peas, dried 

Onions ■ 

Potatoes, white,. , 

Other fresh vegetables. , , 
Canned- 

Asparagias 

Baked beans & pork Sc beans 

Corn 

Peas 

Soups 

Tomatoes 

Other canned vegetables,. 

Pickles , 

Ketchup and other 

t omato sauce s, 

Other sauces and relishes , 
Other vegetable preparations 

Tota,l vegetables end prep. 
Misc. vegetable products ; 

Bevorages, incl, malt liquors, 
wines, fiu.it juices, etc, ^ 



Unit 



Year endad-June 30 



_Qiian_LL±ir_ 



19o4-o5 



193i3-36 
■pre lira. 





Thousands 


' Thousands 


t CLO 1 1 p T q 


d n 1 1 P T* c« 


lb. 


; 26 


. il' " 


: 12 


2 


Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 

Jib . 


153 
e/ 1 
e/' 2 

324 
1,147 


. - 164 
21 
107 
229 
1, o39 


: 22 

:±/ 1 

;e/' 4 
: 64 
: 53 


: 26 

• 4 

26 

: 47 

40 


Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 


849 
3,140 
373 
- U 


776 
3,423 

546 


; 92 
: 337 
: 43 

s? 


97 
424 
61 
65 








534 


o47 


Lb. 
Lb , 


187 
127 
^/ 


209 
. 137 


: 26 
• 30 

65 


30 
31 
115 


Lb . 
Lb. 

Lb. 

Lb. 


1 , 943 
38 
5,552 
16,697 

b / 


3,163 
53 
6,893 
16,515 
b/ 


65 
2 
105 
192 
252 


123 

3 
99 
252 
265 


Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb . 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 


353 
1,233 

359 
9. SO 
948 
720 
1 , 578 
510 


423 
1,311 

573 
l,2ol 
1,105 

661 
1,908 

669 


51 
59 
27 
70 
93 
37 
115 
47 


60 
62 
38 
89 

116 
51 

150 
63 


Lb. 

Lb. 


1,947 
2,462 . 
b/ . 


2,156 
2,405 
b/ 


138 ; 
259 . 
17 : 


133 
302 
21 








1,529 


1 V o22 




.by ; 




1,161 : 


1,431 



1954-55 



1,000 



1,000 



Continued 



Novein"ber 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and M?.rk6ts 



675 



AGHICULTURMj MD J^'OItdiST PEODUCTS: Shipments from the United States to Havfaii, 
1934-35 and 1935-36, cont^d 



.Commodity shipped 



Unit 



Y ear ende d .June 3p^ 



' ci'uantit;; 







1935-36 




1935-36 




1934-35 


prelim. 


1934-35 


prelim. 








-L. ) w w vy 


1 000 






Th oil S P TLC\ s 


d 0 1 1p "t 

■vt* u _L. -L. ( — J X O 


d 0 1 Ir-* r 9, 




556 


409 


34 


24 


Gal. 


86 


87 


21 


23 


' Lh. 


425 


465 


71 


SO 




' h/ ■ 


.... .y. 
I. ^ 


109 


60 


















17. 311 


19,446 










?7 


IVi ft 


41 


66 


908 


1, 631 




P./ 








M 


2 


2 


4 


12 


L. ft. 


250 


74 


47 


11 


hO . 


Q P 
Zl o 






7Q 


3q.uai-e 


s 17 


^ 46 


40 


112 


No. 


•5 


7 


31 


51 




- 




40 


51 








1 , 258 


2,087 








59 


95 








. 1,315,,. 


2 , 209 








5,481 


D,443 








...11,830., 


15.002 








17,311 


19,445 








70 , 904 


84,858 



Value 



VSGETABLi; PHODUCTS, COilTINUED: 
Misc. vegetaole pr oducts , c ont' d : 

Starch. ■ 

Vinegar 

Yeast 

Other misc. vegetahle products 
Total veget£."ble products g^/ 
TOTIL AGPICULTUHiiL SHIPlViMTS a/g/ 
PORES T PPODUCTS: 

Naval stores, gums Gjid resins,, . 
food ; 

Boards , planks , scantlings , etc 

Cooperage and box material 
■ Laths 

Piling 

Railro£.d ties 

Shingles 

Telegraph, trolley, aad 
electric light poles 

Other v/ood . , 

Total wood 

Other forest products ... 
TOTAL SPECIPIEL lOREST PRODUCTS 
AGRICULTURAL - 

Total animal products ....... 

Total vegetable products ^ 



TOTAL AGRI CULTUPuAL SEIPiviPNTS a/g/ 

TOTAL SHIPIMTS (TO hAi;AIl) 

ALL COlviivIODlTIES h/ 



Compiled from official records of 

a/ Excludes foreign merchandise, 

^by Reported in value only, 

c/ Less than 500. 

d/ J^oly 1 _ December 31, 

s/ January 1 - June 30. ' 

£./ Excludes barley, corn and oats, 

§7 Excludes distilled liquors, 

k/ Includf^s foreign merchandise. 



the Bureau of I'oreign and. Domestic Co 



mnerce . 



676 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 22 



AGRI CUi^TUPAi. Pr.ODuCTS: Shipments to the United States from Puerto 

Pico, 19o4-35 and 1955-36 



Commodity shipped 



Unit 



Ye ar ended June 30 



Quantity. 



1934-35 



1935-36 
p relim. 



Value 



1934-35 



MliviAL PRODUCTS: : 

Beeswax ; Xj"b, 

Hides and skins- ; 

Cattle [ Xi"b, 

Goat : Lt. 

Honey : Lb. 

Other animal products : Ld, 

Total animal products ■ 

VEGETABLE PRODUCTS; i 

Cacao "beans Lb. 

Chocolate ; Lb. 

Coffee, ^reen ; 

Por export ; Lh. 

Por domestic use ; L'b. 

Cotton, unmfd. (473 lb.) \ Bale 

Pruits and preparations ; ] 
Presh- : 

Citrons ; Lb, 

Grapefruit : Box 

Oranges : bqx 

Pineapples i Lox 

Other fresh fruits ; 

Prepared or pi-cserved (canned • 
or otherwise)- [ 

Grapefruit ' Lb . 

Pineapples ; lo. 

Pruit juices ; Gal. 

Other prep, or pres. fruits ; Lb. 
Total fruits and. • 

preparations \ 

Nuts, coconuts, in the shell,....: M 
Oils, vegetable : : 

Say : Lb, 

Other vegetable oils ' Lb. 

Seeds, except oilseeds ; Lb. 

Su gar end molasses ; • 

Molasses " j 0^1. 

Si^^P ; Gal. 

Sugar- (2,000 lb. ton) : 

Refined ; rj^Q^ 

Unrefined ; n-Q^^ 



Thousands 



Thousands 



22 

1,298 
20 
1,139' 
a/ ■ 



82 
0, 

740 
12 



930. 
215 

17 

39 6 



a/ 



7,825 
1 , 897. 
42 
151 



14 



45, 

45,396 
0 

98 
657 



25 

1 , 840 
26' 
1,473' 



1 , 000 
dollars 

4 

66 
5 

'60 ■ 
1 



i; 



51 

4 

2,225 
63 



. 929 
356 
5 

' 521 
a/. . 



8,213 
1,882 
160 
81 



10 

0 

192 
3 
1 



34 
484 

37 
911 
5 



480 
125 
33 
12 



^021 



13- 

16' 
11 
31 

32,617 
1 

113 

720 



233 
15 



2,099 

0 

7,922 
59,915 



Continued - 



lIovenlDer 30, 1936 ?orjign Crops end iferkots 677 

AQ'RlG'JLTUra-Tj PHOrUCTS: Shipirionts to the United Stc.tos from Puerto 

Pico, 1934-35 end 1935-36, cont'd 









Year ended 


June 30 




Commodity shipped 


Unit 


Quantity 


Value 












X5I t.^^— O D 






J- ^ .- — O 


p re 1 im , 




pi C X XJU e 


Vj]GETaBLE PHODUCTS, OONTIMJED: 








1,000 


1,000 


Tobacco, unmanufactured: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Leaf- 












Stemmed ......... 


L"b. 
L"b. 
LI. 
Lb. 


16,523 
122 

3-y -wtci^ — 

19.974 


18,533 
83 

_4^5-41— - 


6 , 65 6 

39 
454 — • 


8, 656 
21 

, &.7-7 




otems, scraps ana trirmnings . . . . 


23.157 


7,146 


9.254.. 


V c^^t; Uo, U_Lt;Sl 




r- J- ■ , . ■ .. 










Lb, 
Lb. 


3 , &86 
611 


4, 659 
482 


162 
27 


177 
26 


uoiiei i^caiinea, a.riecL, eocj 


Miscellaneous veHeta.hle r.-rnc.nr'.tf^- 












Beverages (incl. v/ine , malt 












liquors, fro.it juices , etc. )c/ 


Gal. 


8 


9 


11 


7 




Lb. 
Lb. 


105 

136 
a/ 


77 
128 
a/ 


3 
22 


3 
25 


BulDs, roots, trees, etc. 


Other vegetaole uroducts 


7 


1 


Total vegetaole -products ..c/ 








59,891 


74,973 


TOTAL AGPICULTLIRaL SHIPlvir^NTS c/' 








50,027 


75.185 


TOTAL SKIPiVLiKTS (PU^PTO PlCiiK 












PPOD.) ALL COi.iiODITILS 








75,684 


95,004 











Compiled from official records of the Bureau of jjoreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Reported in value only, b/ Less than 500. c/ Excludes distilled liquors. 



AGPlGULTuTlAL iu^L POHEST PHODUCTS: Shipments from the United States to Puerto 

Pico, 1934-35 and 1935-36 a/ 









Y3a.r ended June 30 




Commodity shipped 


Unit 


><tU£ntity 


Value 








1935-36 




1935-36 






1934-35 


-prelim. 


1934-35 


prelim. 










1 , 000 


1,000 


A1'II1vl4L Al>ID AlTIivuJL PPODUCTS: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Animals, live 








21 


42 


Dairy products: 










Butter 


Lb. 


806 


878 


266 


300 


Cheese 


Lb. 


1,374 


1,527 


259 


295 



Continued - 



578 ■ foreign Crops raid lus^rkets Vol. 33, No. 22 

AG-B.I CULTUHaL iiiiL POPl.lS-T FriOLUCTS: Siiipuents from the United States to Puerto 

?JCO, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Commodity snipped : Unit 



AIJIiviALS & Ain:/iAL PRODUCTS, CONT'D \ 
Dairy products, c ontinued; | 
Milk and cream- 
Condensed, svveatened : Lb. 

Evaporated, unsweetered ; Lb. 

Powdered, dried- ; 

Skimmed ; Lo . 

li'liole '• Lu . 

Infants' food, malted : 

milk, etc ; Lb . 

Total dairj^ products ; Lb. 

Eggs, in the sliell ; Doz.. 

Meats and meat p r oducts; • 
Meats- : 
Beef and veal- : 

Presh or frozen ; Lb. 

Pickled or cured ; Lb. 

Canned, incl. corned, etc. ; Lb. 

Total beef and veal ; Lb. 

- Mutton and larab • Lb. 

Pork- : 

Presn or irozen, loins , etc. ■ Lb. 

Ba.con : ld. 

Hams 6i shoulders, cured... : Lb. 

Pickled or malted : Lb, 

Canned ; Lb . 

Total pork ; Lb.. 

Poultry and game, fresh. Lb. 
Sausage- j 

Canned ; Lb. 

Not canned [ Lb, 

Other mea.ts- '• 

Presh, cui-ed, etc '■ Lb. 

Sausage ingredients, j 

salted, etc ; Lb. 

Canned ; Lb, 

Total meats ; Lb, 

Meat extracts and bouillon ; 

cubes : Lb, 

Sausago ca.aings ' Lb, 



Year ended June 30 


; C/;u.anti'oy 


Value 




1-' oi'—Z'O 






' 1 S 4;—" 3 o 


_pi3i:.;!:. 


; 1934-35 


'orelin. 






; 1,000 


1 , 000 


;Thou sands 


Thousands 


: dollars 


dollars 


: 252 


257 


: • 32 


34 


: 4,716 


5, 718 


: 338 


458 


i 19 


82 


: 1 


5 


; 345 


567 


i 108 


166 


138 


321.. 


; 49 


67 






• 1,053 


1.326 


: 220 


175 


; 50 


.46 


; 410 


429 


: 63 


83 


I 1 
1 -LO 


ox 


J. 


R 


' 0 5 c 3 o 


4,558 


: 453 


8 53 


• O , iOOO 


■J . vjoo 


•SI 7 




[ 367 




41 


12 


: 258 


177 


; 41 


35 


; 532 


505 


; 58 


75 


; 7 , 448 


5,801 


957 


1 , 058 


i 11,742 


10,310 


1,132 


1,260 


; 191 


226 


51 


64 


; 20,171 


17,019 


2 . 239 


2,492 


: 77 


79 


18 


21 


: 833 


1,056 


139 


194 


: 2,280 


1,837 


3'B4 


364 


: 115 


85 


12 . 


12 


; 2,628 


2, 697 


116 ; 


147 


: 941 


584 


96 : 


126_ 


: 33,670 


28 , 453 


3,552 ; 


4 , 322 


: 2 


;2- 


2 ' 


2 


4 


8 ; 


1 ; 


2 



Continued - 



NovemlDer 30, 1936 



Poreign Crops a.nd Markets 



679 



AGai CUlTUxIAL AlO i-'OP^ST PPlODUGTS; ' Sr. ipmei.ts from the United States to Puerto 

F.ico, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Coinmodity shipped 



Unit 



Year ended J-me 30 



Q;u-a.ntit.7 







; lyoD-UO 








i 1934-35 


; prelim. 


■ 1934-35 


; prelim. 








; 1,000 


: 1 , 000 




; Thousands 


5 Thousands 


1 dollars 


• dolle,rs 


liD. 


■ 21,058 


: 19,061 


; 2,457 


: 2,572 


Ld. 


: 1,069 


: 1 , 4iD 


; 124 


; 197 


Ld. 


: 121 


I ^ ^ 


19 




Lb-. 


22.26S 


: 20,526 


• 2 , 600 


; 2,776 


Lt. 


56,144 


; 48 , 989 


; 6,155 


1 7 , 102 








3 0 


: 155 








7,315 


8 , 653 


Lb. 


321 


404 


96 


122 


Lb . 


198 


306 


. 20 


29 


Lb . 


341 


19 


43 


3 


5o:c 


24 


32 


47 


58 


Lb. 


444 


530 


37 


44 


Lb. 


290 


369 


20 


22 




b / 


h 


■ lii 










117 


146 


Lb . I 


29 6 _ 


575 


22 


27 


Lb. : 


390 ' 


433 


21 


22 


Lb . 1 


X24 


J- {L 


io 


1 0 


Lb. : 


810 ■ 


1,155 


59 


63 


Lb. : 


228 ; 


382 ; 


19 : 


66 


Lb. : 


427 


580 : 


43 i 


57 


Lb. : 


172 ; 


283 ; 


22 : 


34 


Lb , 


1 O 3 ' 
lb O • 


<c-4c . 




of^ 
ciO 


Lb . : 


1 , Ci25 [ 


1,491 ; 


104 : 


150 


Ld. ; 


lo9 : 


145 ; 


18 : 


22 








298 ; 


386 


Bu. : 


23 i 


18 : 


24 i 


17 


Bu. ; 


128 : 


123 : 


81 : 


57 


Lb. \ 


297: 


51 i 


10 : 


2 



Yalue 



MlIviALS Aj}JD iil'IIiviAL PHOL. CONT'D; 
Oils and fats, anima-l ; 

Lard , , 

Oleomargarine 

Other oils and fats, animel.,. 
Total oils and fats, : -iir.e,l 
Total meats, meat pr'odu^ts, 

oils and fats 

Other animal c)ro ducts •. . . . 

Tote-1 animals cxid animal 

products 

VEGETABLE PRODUCTS: 
Chocolabe and cocoa .; 

Chocolate , incl. s^.veetene 

Cocoa., powdered 

Coffee, green and roasted 

Truits and preparations ; 
Eresh- 

Apples 

Grapes , . . . 

Pee,rs 

Other fresh frait 
Tots.l fresh fruits 
Dried end eYaporated- 
Prune s 



la isms 



Derated 



Other dried fruit 
Tota.l dried or ev 
Canned- 
peaches 

Pe ar s 

Emit for salads 

Other canned frait . . . 
Tota.l canned fruits 
Other fruit prepars.tic ns 
Total fruits and fruit 

preparations 

Gra ins and grain procLu cts; 
Grains- 

Corn (56 lb.) 

Oats (32 lb.) 

Rice- 
Paddy or rough 

iv.illed, including brcY/n.. 



Lb. 



226,819 



215,994 



7,664 



Continued - 



'680 loTsi^n. Crops and Markets Yol. 33, Uo. 22 

AGEICULKIML S'OBEST PHODUCTS: Shipments from the United States to Puerto 

P.ico, 1934-5./. fJTid 1935-36, cont'd 



Tear ended j-une 30 



Coffimodity sMpp-'Sd ■ 


Unit 




L-jlrtl.- -hi , , , 

1935-36 




1935-56 






1934-35 ; 


'oreliiu . 


1934.-35 


prelii'a . 










1 , UUU 


1 r.nn 
± . O'JU 


G-rains e-.id grain products, cont'd 




Thousands ', 


Thousands 


dollars 


cioj.xa_ s 


Meal and flour- 














PdI , 


54 . 


83 


2d 




Oatrasal, ilaked ana 














Ld . 






±02 


lid < 


Pice screjenlngs, "broken rice, 














Ld . 


2C6 


cz 


o 


lu 


Wneat ^ flov-r- . 


Ebl . 


c_/ 159 




c_/ 92o 




Wnoii^- ci U.S. wnec^u 


BdI . 


d/ 214 


o o 


d/ i . ly^z 


2 , /cUo 


Otl\er Wi. -"i'.it flour 


J3 Dl . 


d/ e / 


e/ 


a/ .d 




Total grains '3nd ^ .oui's 








I'J , /dCO 




ivi J- o t; J — L^iwJuLo gj. u-J-Ii UXUL-U-OOo 












JjX S'^U.-L I' S c-JlCL Cx.aCiVcrb— 














Lb'. 


857 


1 , 541 


152 


207 


Unsweetened 


Lb . 


1 492 


1 , 527 


192 


235 


'Cereal foods- 














Lb. 


80 


92 


11 


12 


■Rheat- 












Readj to eat 


Lb. 


34 


14 


4 


2 


To "be cooked 


L'b. 


90 


129 


■ 10 


15 




Lb. 


38 


44 


6 


7 


Hominy and corn £'rit i 


Lb. 


40 


82 


1 


3 


Macaroni, s"pa.ghetti, etc. .. 


iro . 


706 


876 


50 


60 


Other grains & X)re'p8,rat: ons 




t/ 




8 


7 


Total iPiisc. grfin Dr iiUcts 








434 


546 


Peeds ^rd fod'^erq- f^P^O ) 






e/ 


- 






Ton 


e/ 


11 


3 


Mi IT t" epil q- " 












MixPfl ripiT'ir fpprlc! 


Ton 


9 


11 


398 


456 


Mi TTpfl Tinnltrv fppri 


Ton 


p 


"2 


"65 


70 






e/ 


• e/ 


19 


11 


other feeds, incl . "bran, etc. 


Ton 


2 




75 


106 


Oil caice and oil-cake meal . . . 


Ton 


1 


1 


: 22 - 


17 


Total feeds and fodders f / 








591 


643 




Lb. 


5 


5 


1 


1 


Kuts 


Lb. 


138 


133 


22 


21 


Oils and fa,ts, vegeta"ble : 












Pixed or expressed- 














Lb. 


15 


2,570 


; 1 


- 200 


Corn oiT 


Lb. 


212 


; ■ 100 ■ 


: 19 


13 


Cottonseed, refined 


Lb. 


368 


: 164 


; 43 


17 


Cooking fats other 














Lb. 


1,962 


; 3 , 658 


; 216 


322 



Continued - 



November 30, 1936 



roreign Crops and Markets 



681 



A5RI CULTURAL MD POEEST PRODUCTS : Shipments from the United States to Puerto 

Rico, 1934—35 and 1935-35, cont'd 



Year ended June 30 



oOiiimocLx oy smppBCL 


UniT 


: aiantity 


Val^ 






1935-36 




1935-36 


— - . , 




; 1934-35 


: prelim. 


: 1934-35 


■ prelim. 


VEGETABLE PROEUCTS, CONT'D: 








: 1 , 000 


; 1,000 . 


Oils and fats, vegetao]e, cont'd: 






' Thmi Rfinds 

J. J. J. V> LA. O C'. V-A. t.J 


; dollars 


. dollars 


Pixed or expressed, cont'd- 














Lb. 


i 733 


: 791 


; 75 


: 82 




Lb. 


j 206 


: 455 


; 13 


; 38 


Other expressed vegetable 














Lb. 


' 26 


: 369 


I b 


: 33 


Total fixed or exp. oils 


Lb. 


, - ■' '.'J 


8 , 107 


377 


: 704 


Essential or distilled 




', -, / 

£/ 


b/ 


11 


: 15 




Lb. 


193 


244 


24 


; 25 


Tobacco leaf, unmanuf actijired; 














Lb. 


1,160 


l,C'il 


346 


: 292 


Other leaf 


Lb. 


427 


•652 


25 


: 55 




Lb . 


1,587 


1,693 


371 


; 347 


Vegetables and preparations : 












Vegetables- 












Dried and fresh- 














Lb. 


27,302 


29,406 


1 , 290 


1,124 




Lb. 


533 


3 9 2<o2 


22 


141 




Lb. 


6,526 


9,115 


125 


171 




Lb. 


42,571 


45,371 


325 


491 


Other fresh vegetables ... 




^/ 


^/ 


33 


51 


Canned- 














Lb. 


102 


96 


13 


18 


Baked beans, & pork & beans 


Lb. 


65 


67 


4 


5 


Corn 


Lb. 


87 


205 


7 


13 


Peas 


Lb. 


215 


3-08 ; 


19 


26 




Lb. 


653 • 


649 ' 


53 


58 




Lb. 


651 ' 


457 i 


37 


22 


Other canned vegetables . . 


Lb. 


401 ; 


625 : 


35 


51 




Lb. 


80 


77 i 


10 


9 


Ketchup & other tomato sauces 


Lb . 


1,270 ; 


2,452 : 


102 


161 


Other sauces and relishes .... 


Lb. 


307 ' 


369 : 


43 


62 


Other vegetable preparations 
Total vegetables & prep. . . . 






b' i 




18_ 








2 , 1 3-3 


2 , 421 


Misc. vegetable products: 












Beverage s,incl. malt liquors, 
wine, fruit juices, etc. g/ 






^/ i 


368 : 


553 


Starch, corn and corn flour . . 


Lb. 


2,284 ; 


2,345 i 


79 : 


81 




Gal . 


51 :' 


73 ; 


21 '; 


29 




Lb. 


654 ■ 


601 ! 


79 i 


84 


Other misc. veg. products .... 








55 ; 


106 


Total vegetable products g/ 








15,304 ; 


17, B65 


TOTAL AG-RICULTURAL PRODUCTS a/g/ 








22,619 ■ 


26,513 



Continued - 



682 



foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, ¥.0. 22 



AGEICULTUilAl AlID TOEZST FRCFJCTS: Shipments from the United States to Puerto 

Rico, 1934-35 .and 1935-35, cont'd 



Year ended Ju.ne 30 



CommiOdity shipped 


; Unit 


; Q-aantity 


Value 


i 1934-35 


1935-36 
prelim. 


1934-35 


1935-36 
prelim. 


POxGST PRODUCTS: 

KaT3.1 stores, gums and resins . . 
Wood- 
Boards, planks, scantlings , etc- 

Douglas fir 

Southern pine 


M.ft. 
M.ft . 


; Thousaiids 


Thousands 


1,000 
dollars 


1 , 000 
dollars 


' 17 

33 


17 
42 
1 


15 

234 
809 
33 


14 

272 
1,132 

45 


Total "boards, planks, etc. 
Cooperage & >ox material- 
Other cooperage & "box mat. . 


M.ft. 

B.f t . 

Lin .it 
ilo. 


50 


60 


1 , 031 


1,449 


1,658 

47 
140 
W 


1,909 
^/ 

22 
219 
h/ 


85 
5 
19 
117 
35 


75 
2 
11 
119 
86 








1,343 


1,742 


Veneer packages for 


w 


^/ 

h/ 


75 
17 


113 

32 


TOTj\L SPECIPIED POEEST PHOrUCTS 
AGRICULTUHikL - ! 

Total vegetahle products g/ : 

TOTAL AGHI CULTURAL SHIPMENTS a/g/j 

TOTAL SHIPMEITTS (TO PUERTO 

RICO) ALL GOLCvlODITIZS h/ ; 






1,450 


1,901 






7,315 
15,304 


8,653 
17.865 






22, 619 
S3 , 574 


26,518 
77,175 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Poreign and Domestic Commerce. 

a/ Excludes foreign, prodacts. 

h/ Reported in value only. 

c/ July l-DecemlDer 31. 

d/ January 1-June 30. ^ 

e_/ Less than 500. 

f/ Excludes corn and oats. 

g/ Excludes distilled liquors. 

h/ Includes foreign merchandise. 



m 



November 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



583 



AGRICULTURAL A¥D FOREST PRODUCTS: Shipments to the United States 
from Alask;a, 1934-35 and 1935-36 



Year ended June 30 



Commodity shipped 




Quant 


ity 


Vf 


ilue 


Unit 




1935-36 




: 1935-36 






1334-35 


prelim. 


1934-35 


: -prelim. 


ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


1,000 
dollt.rs 


; 1,000 

; dollars 




No. 


a/ 




g 


; 15 


Reindeer products: 




a/ 






Lb. 


803 


395 


72 


: 35 




Lb. 


39 




4 


i a/ 




Lb. 


77 


74 


11 


: 8 




• Lb. 


125 


122 


41 


; 


TOTAL AGRICULTUFA.L SHIPMENTS 






137 


: 30 


TOTAL FOREST PRODUCTS (incl. 












wood, timber and I'omber) 


M. ft. 


2 


3 


57 


: 131 


TOTAL SHIPMENTS, (ALASKAN 












PRODUCTS) ALL COMIviODITIES ..... 








44,254 


i 38,112 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreiei'n and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Less than 500. 



AG-RICUI/TURAL AI^D FOREST PRODUCTS: Shipments from the United States, 

to Alaska, 1934-35 and 1935-36 a/ 



Commodity shipoed 



ANNALS AND ANRvIAL PRODUCTS: 
A nimals . Itvp- 

Cattle 

Hogs (sv/ine) 

Horses , , 

Other animals, live, edibl 
Total animals, live 
Dairy -oro ducts; 

Batter 

Cheese 

Milk- 
Condensed, sweetened . . . 
Evaporated, unsweetened 
Total dairy products . 
Eggs in the shell , 



Unit 



No. 
No. 
No. 



Year ended June 50 



Quantity 



1934-35 



Thousa.nds 



h/ 



1935-36 
prelim. 



-ThousjiQii& 



h/ 
h/ 







.. ....^ 


52 


43 


Lb. 
Lb. 


1 , 548 

346 


1,660 

378 


471 
71 


553 
82 


Lb. 


66 


• 42' 


10 


7 


Lb. 


5,322 


5,131 : 


339 


344 


Lb. 


7,282 


7,261 : 


891 '. 


966 


Doz . 


1,523 


1 , 646 • 


■ 417 


476 



Value 



1934-35 



1,000 

26 
4 
16 



193^36 
prel.iii.^ 



1.000 
doll ars 

17 

3 

15 



•Continued - 



684 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 35, i^To. 22 



AGRICULTURAL MD FOREST PRODUCTS-: Shipments from the United States 
to Alaska, 1934-35 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Commodity shipped 



ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PROD. CONT'D: 
Meats and m.eat products: 

Beef and veal, fresh 

Beef & veal, pickled or cured 

Beef, cajined 

Total "beef and veal 

Mutton and larnh 

Po rk- 

Bacon, incl. Cumberland sides 
Hams and shoulders, cured 

Fresh and pickled 

Total pork 

Poultry and game, fresh ...... 

Sausage- 
Canned 

Not canned 

Other canned meats , . . . 

Other meats & sausage casings 
Oils and fnts^ animal; 

Lard 

Other animal oils & fats- 

Edihle 

Inedible 

Total oils and fats, animal 
Total meats & meat prod. , 
oils & fats, animal .... 
Other animals and animal 

products . 

Total animals &- animal prod. 
VEGETABLE PRODUCTS; 

Cocoa ,and chocolate 

Coffee 

■Fruits anri prepo .rations : 
Fresh or dried- 
Apples 

Oranges 

Raisins 

Other fresh or dried fruit . 
Total fresh or dried 



Unit 



Year ended J"ane, 30 



Quan t i ty 





; 1934- ,ib 


. 1935-36 
: pi'elim. 


; 193'l-5b 


; 1935-56 
; prelim. 




[Thousands 


Thousands 


• 1 , 000 
; dollsrs 


i 1,000 
: dollars 


J_l u • 


PlR 


^ 7 cr c 


'• 4-1 8 


; SAP 


dJU • 


57 


' QO 


fi 

Q 


; 11 


J-iU • 










Lb. 


3 , 599 


A, 204 


478 


: 616 


Lb. 


. 382 


445 


54 


: 71 


Lb. 


898 


807 


237 


: 268 


JjD. 


Oc O 








Lb. 


91o 


O O f*7 

983 


165 


■ 204 


Lb. 




2 .449 


549 


boi 


Lb. 


555 


537 


126 


141 


Lb. 


86 


103 


21 


25 


Lb. 


351 


368 


67 


81 


Lb. 


301 


289 


80 


85 


Lb. 


1^-0 


178 


21 


29 


Lb. 


349 


32 6 


45 


48 


Lb. 


65 


47 


7 


5 


Lb. 


54 




2 


1 


Till 


^6fi 


405 


54 




Lb. 


8,311 


8,978 


1,450 


1, 764 




c/ 


■ c/ 


58 ; 


89 








2,868 ; 


5,328 


Lb. 


- 86 


107' 


17 : 


19 


Lb. 


■ 975 


1,054 


250 : 


250 


Box 


34 ; 


55 


60 : 


65- 


Box 


18' ; 


21 ■' 


76 i 


81- 


Lb. : 


■ 217' : 


218 




14 


Lb. i 


■ 2,874 ; 


,3,129 ! 


193 ; 


215 








342 ; 


575 



Value 



Continued - 



Novsrater 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



685 



AGRICULTUEAL AITO FOREST PRODUCTS: Shipments from the United States 

to Alaska, 1934-55 and 1935-36, cont'd 









Year ended June 3C 




Commodity snipped 


Unit 


Quant i ty 


Value 




1935-36 




; 1935-3 6 






1 Jo4— oD 


prelim. 


1934-^5 


prelim. 


V■I?^■T'Pi■RT,'^'. PPOTlTirmc; PDTJrp TTvTTrv'n • 
V JliVxjli liiij-LjJ;j ST XWj XJ Jw ± O ^ L'VJi\ X J-rJ U-lLiJJ . 








1,000 


1,000 


;J'r"u.it3 , cont'd; 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


: dollars 


Prepared or preserved- 














Lb. 


2,097 


2 , 939 


185 


264 


Preserved fruits , jellies , etc. 


Lb. 


365 


410 


44 


50 










5/1 


C Q Q 

, boy 


Grains and grain products: 




, 









ijrains— 














Eu. 


1 


1 


1 


' 1 




Bu. 


1 


1 


1 


1 




Bu. 






J-rr 


1 ? 


Rice, incl. flour, meal, 
















1,102 


.1,068 


51 


51 






1 


2 


1 


2 


Meals and flour- 














Bbl. 


2 


2 


14 


12 


Ha tTne a 1 ^ vo llpr^ nr-t^; .... „ 








2d 


21 




Bbl. 


47 


46 


323 


310 


Total grains and liour .... 








431 


410 


Miscellaneous grain products- 




, 










Lb. 


956 


1,076 


119 


133 


Cereal breaJtiast foods 


Lb. 


318 


391 


36 


45 


Other erain^; t)rp"Da"^a ti on"^ 






c/ 


61 


69 


looai mis cei -Lsneous gram 




















216 


247 


Feeds and fodders: (2.240 Ih.) 




, 


' ' 








Ton 


1 


2 


31 


42 




Ton 


1 


1 


34 


37 


Other feeri'^. inrl. ^rr'f'pni n2"s . . 


Ton 


1 


1 


26 


28 


Oil m kp A- n T 1— r* p kp m p t 1 . - 




k/ 




2 


3 


Total fpprl=? pTlcI fof^dpr'=i p/. . . 


Ton 


3 


4 


93 


110 




Lb. 


134 


149 


31 


33 


Oils ^nd fats, ve&'etable ; 


Expresspd- 












Cooking fats other thau lard 


Lb. 


660 


754 


85 


102 




Lb. 


93 


109 


11 


13 


Other vegetable oils & fats . 


Lb. 


260 


356 


36 


54 


Total oils, expressed ..... 


Lb. 


1.^013 


1,199 


132 


169 


Seeds, field tmd garden, except 














Lb. 


119 


159 


11 


15 


Sugar, molasses, and sirups: 




Gal. 


36 


40 


35 


39 


sugar, refined (2,000 lb.) 


Ton 


3 


3 


266 


284 


Total sugar, molasses, etc. 








301 


323 



Continued - 



6B6 



To reign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 22 



AGHICULTUML MD IDEEST PRODUCTS: Shipments from the United States 

to Alaska, 1934-35 and 1935r>36, cont'd 







Year ended 


June 30 




Commodity shipped 


Unit 


Quant i ty 


Value 




1935-36 




,1935-36 






1934-35 


"Orel im . 


1934-35 


Iprelim. 


VEGETABLE PESDUCTS, COrTIlIUEl): 










• J- J vJUU 




Thousands 


Thousand 


R dollars 


' dollars . 




Lb. : 


■ 163 


124 


76 


i 59 


Vegetables and preparations! 












Dried and fresh- 














Lb. ; 


481 


445 


: 26 


23 




Lb. : 


69 


91 


i 4 


4 ' 




Lb. : 


1,177 


1,283 


41 


36 




Lb. : 


.6,009, 


6 , 943 


103 


: 143 




Lb. \ 


3,290 


4, 701 


: 279 


; 382 


Other vegetables & prep 


Lb. ; 


3,212 


3,672 


165 


: 190 










618 


i_ -ZZ8 


Misc. vegetable products: 












Beverages and fruit juices fj , 


Gal. : 


1,081 


1,239 


1,819 


\ 1,779 




Lb. : 


^71 . 


. , , . 86 


5 


: 6 


Other vegetable food prod. . . . 




• c / 


.. c/ 


58 


i 51 


Other inedible veg. prod 




£/ ^ 


c/ 


; 16 


i _ . 17 


Total vegetable products fJ . 








4,645 


4,955 


TOTAL AGillCULTUPJlL SHIPMEl^ITS qJ tl 








7,513 


8,293 


FOEEST PRODUCTS: 












Naval stores( ro sin, tar, tur- 














Lb. ; 


85 


110 


8 


■ 9 


Wood: 












Boards, planks, and s c'jjitlings- 














M.ft. • 


14 


14 


293 


341 


Other boards, planks, etc... 


M.ft. 




1 


41 


62 


Total boards , planks , etc. . . 


M.ft. , 


1 A 

14 


"1 rr 

15 


ii34 


403 




Bd.ft. ; 


381 


3,047 


10 


91 




CIp + 

oe u 


26 


51 


6C 


113 


Logs and timber, hewn & sawed 


M. ft. : 


2 




54 


70 


Shingles 


Squares 







9 


10 


TOTAL SPECIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS 






475 


. 696 


AG-R I CULTURAL - 












Total animal products 








2,868 


3,328 


Total vegetable prodticts fj . . . 








4,645 


4,965__ 


TOTAL AGRICULTUaiL SEII^EI^S a/i/ 








7,515 


8,29.';. 


TOTAL SHIB^TTS (TO ALASKA) 












ALL COMKODITIES a/ 








30,200 


35,835 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign cind Domestic Comm.erce. 
a/ Includes foreign merchandise, b/ Less than 500. oj Reported in value 
only. d/ "Wholly of United States wheat" and "other wheat" flour not 
separately classified. e/ Excludes barley, corn and oats. f/ Excludes 
distilled liquors. 



NovemlDer 30, 1935 
AGRICUL'TURAL PHOEUCTS; 



]?oreign Crops and Markets 



687 



Shipments to the United States from Virgin Islands 
January-jTone , 1935 and 1935^35 a/ 



Commodity shipped 



MIMLS MD MIMiL PRODUCTS: 
Animals, live; 

Cattle 

Other animals, live 

Total animals, live 

Hides and skins, raw (except furs) 

Total animals & animal products 
"VEGETABLE PEOIUCTS: 

Eruits and preparations 

Sagar, cane (2,000 It).) 

Tomatoes, fresh 

Misce llane ous vegeta l)l e products- 

Arrowroot , starch, flour, etc. 

Other vegetahle products 

Total vegetable products d/ . 

TOTAL AGRICULTURAL SHIPMMTS d/ 

TOTAL SHIPHEiTTS (VIRGIN ISLAUDS 
PROLUCTS) ALL COiMODITISS 



Unit 



Ho. 



Lh. 



Ton 
Lh. 

Lh. 



Year ended june 30 



Quantity 



Valr.e 











tj an .—June 


±zl oO— OO 


J an .—June 


1935 


prelim . 


1935 


prelim. 






1 , 000 


1:, 000 


'. Thousands 


• Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


1 


; ■ 3 


14 


51 


h/ 


; h/ 

, „^ 1 


c/ 


1 






14 


52 


; • 27 


: 57 


2 


2 






i 0 


0'± 




! W 


c / 


1 


; 1 


; 3 


55 


178 


: 46 


: 112 


4 


6 


; 0 


60 


0 


3 






3 








72 


188 






33 


242 






177 


406 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Eoreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Reported as a foreign country prior to January 1, 1935. h/ Reported in value 
only. c_l Less than 500. d/ Excludes distilled liquors. 



AGRICULTURAL AlTD ECREST PRODUCTS: Shipments from the United States 
to Virgin Islands, January-June, 1935 and 1935-3J5 a/ 



Year ended Jime 30 



Commodity shipped 


Unit 


Qu-^ntity 


Value 


Jan June 


1935-36 


Jan.-J'ULie 


1935-36 






1935 


•orelim . 


1935 


prelim. 










1,000 


1,000 


ALHMALS MD AHIMAL PROSUCTS; 






Thousands 


doll-aTG 


dollars 


jftp-imals, live: 










2 


Dairy products: 














Lh. 


24 


52 


6 


12 




Lt. 


35 


86 ■ 


7 


15 


Milk, evaporated, unsweetened 


Lh. 


138 


322 


8 


23 








h/ 


1 


4 


Total dairy products 








22 


54 



Continued - 



688 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 22 



AGRI CULTURAL MI) FOREST PRODUCTS: Shipments from the United States 
to Virgin Islands, January-June, 1935 and 1935-36, cont'd 



Commodity shipped 



Unit 



Ye ar ended June 30 



Jan. -June 
1935 


1935-36 
prelim. 


j Jan . -June 
• 1935 


1935-36 
prelim. 


Thousands 


Thousands 


; 1 , 000 

. dollars 


1,000 
dollars 


6 
35 
88 


3 

159 
115 


; 1 
; 3 
: 5 


1 
23 
19 


129 


277 


■ ^ 


43 


c/ 

4 
25 

0 
28 

3 


6 
60 

74 
5 


1 

: 4 
: 0 

! 3 
: 1 


c/ 

! 14 

; c/ 

: 9 

: 2 


60 


146 


; 9 


27 


8 

12 
44 

37 


• 22 

'. 17 

; 69 

11 


' 1 

'. 2 
4 

3 


: 3 
: 3 
; 6 

2 


290 


542 


on 




88 
47 


110 
59 
1 

h/ 


8 

5 

c/ 

2 


15 
8 

c/ 

2 






56 


165 


4 
9 
18 


6 
13 

24 


1 
1 
2 


1 
2 
3 



Mims ANIiaL PROIUCTS, CONT'D 
Meats : 

Beef and veal- 
Fresh or frozen 

pickled or cured 

Canned, incl. corned, etc. 
Total heef and veal .... 
: Pork- 
Fresh or frozen 

Bacon 

Hams and shoulders, cured 
Sides ; Cumberland and Wilt. 

Pickled or salted 

Pork, canned 

Total pork 

Sausage- 
Canned 

Not canned 

Sausage ingredients , salted, etc 
Other mea.ts, fresh, cured, etc. : 

Total meats 

Oils and f ats, an imal : 

Lard 

Oleomargarine 

Other oils & fats, animal ... 

Other animal products 

Total animals & anim.al. prod 
VEGETABLE PROrJCTS: 
Chocolate, incl. sweetened .... 

Cocoa, powdered 

Coffee, green and roasted 

F ruits and prepar ations : 
Fresh- 
Apples 

Grapefruit 

Oranges 

Other fresh fruits 
Dried and evaporated 

Canned fruits 

Other fruit preparations 
Total fruits & preparations 



Lb. 
Lh. 
Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 
Lb, 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 

Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 



Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 



Box 






1 


Box 


£/' 




1 


Box 




«-) 


2 








1/ 


Lb. 




7 


20 


Lb. 




9 ' 


32 


Lb. 




1 ' 


5 



c/ 
c/ 

5./ 



Continued - 



November 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



689 



AGHICULTUP.A1 FOREST PROIUGTS: Shipments from the United States 
to Virgin Islands, January-June , 1935 and 1935-35, cont'd 



Year ended J une 30 



Commodity shipped 


Unit 


0 dxi • ""tJ Lllit/ 




T "jVI . TlT^ o 

*J ciii • "*'J LU.io 


X w^O*.-* O w 






1935 


TDre lim . 


1935 


nrelim • 


V LrJli 1 iLDJjJl JrJr;.UjjU OXO J L' Ui\l 1 X i\l U JJ . 


- 






X , UUU 


1 ODD 


U^X d-XIib v'a^^L j^X ciJ-Ii px UU.U.U Ob. 




1 Xi UU b c3 J 1 Q. b 


X liUlibtil-LU. S 


CLUXXcXX b 


U.UXX dX b 


r\ci+r< ^ "7 0 1 "h, \ 


JjU . 


"1 

1 


1 


J. 


X 




T V 

Ld . 


157 


438 


7 


: 18 






o 


7 


1 A 

Xt: 


' "XX 
, ox 




,1 I • 






1 

X 


: ? 


WV\ p» n "f" 'F* "1 mi Y»« 
(i/i±'3ci 0 X _L UU.X 












TiTKn! 1 ~T of TT . R . whp ^^"h 


XJ L'JL • 




xo 


?1 


: 57 


other wheat 


Bhl . 


c/ 


c/ 


1 


c/ 


Other £:"rain<=; nrd "FT mir<=^ . ... 




b/ 


b/ 


c/ 


■ f/ 

■ . ^ I. . . 


Totol grains and flours .... 








45 


1C9 


Miscellaneous grain products- 












Biscuits and cracker's 


Lh. 


31 


89 


5 


• 15 


Cereal "breakfast foods ..... 


Lh. 


5 


10 


c/ 


; 1 


Other grains & preparations 




b/ 


b/ 


2 


4 


X u Od.L Jil X o O • ^X cLXli UX U LxLl O o 




— 




7 




jBcu-s u-iQ. -i-ocLciers; ydcj^yj ±D. j 












T.'T-i 11 -Tz-i ^ ^ ~ 


Ton 


£/ 


^ / 


5 


l^ 

7 


WXX L-cU — . cliU. UXX.— Uc Xvf iUU c IX • • . 


1 on 




c/ 
2.1 




X 


Wutq • 














T "h 
XJ D • 


x<o 


CiO 


J. 


o 








p 


5./ 


n 1 


n T "1 a n"n '"i *p n "f* <^ Tfo rro +• n l") 1 P • 












XJXJ^CU, UX O j\.L) X O b C U-"" 












rinnV*! ■r^'hc; rTHViPT* •hVia'n 1 o"nr^ 




?4- 


X xo 




XX 


Tii n '^iPPrl nil 


Xi u « 




XiO 




T 
X 


?^^'\7''h'^ nil 


XI *-* • 


<o 


xO 


c/ 


X 


OtllST* PTTiTS <^ c;pr1 HI 1 Q'nri 














T,"b. 


8 


45 


1 


A 


Total fixed oi' eicp. oils 


Lt . 


39 


188 


4 


17 


Essential or distilled oils .. 




_____ 




1 


2 




Lb. 


3 


7 


1 


1 


Tobaxjco leaf, ^uunairofac tared: 












Blac|c fat, vater *;aler sad 












dark Af ri cm * 






! 32 


1 


3 




Lb. 


X 




1 


X 


Tegetahles -and nreparations : 












Vegetaoles, dried & fresh- 














Lb. 


57 


211 


2 


7 




Lb. 


37 


78 


2 ■ 


4 




Lb. 


68 


193 


2 


5 




Lb. 


336 ' 


778 


4 


11 


Other fresh vegetables 




^/ • 




1 < 


5 



690 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, I-Io. 22 



AGRICULTUBAL M£> FOEEST PRODUCTS: Shipments from the United States 
to Virgin Islands, January-June , 1935 and 1935-36, cont'd 









Year ended June 30 




TTn -i t 


Quantity 


Value 






Jan. -June 1935-36 


Jan . -June 


1935-36 






1935 


prelifn . 


1935 


prelin. 


VEGATABLE P^p^Wtcts COFTI■^^UED • 








1,000 


1,000 


Ve;^e ts-lDlB s Slid prt^pars-tions , cont ' 


d 


Thousands 


Thou sand s 


dollars 


dollars 


CanriBd vegetctloles 


Lb . 


54 


155 


4 


11 






22 


77 


2 


6 


T o "h 1 P - i", Q 7i 1 p c" n H ti tpti 

X U J-. V "-v U U X O O/iivX \J X \^ iJ • 








17 


49 


Miscellaneous vG^et3."ble products 












X; t/ V o X Ob, X li U J- • M cl X u X 1 U U.U I S , 
















b/ 




4 


19 


St 0 "Poh. n 0 m n (\ d t h p "r 


Lb . 


41 


103 


2 


4 


uL/iiyi V c£,c Liccuxe produces 




b , ■' 


-, / 
]!/ 


2 


5 


Total vegetable products d/ 








luO 


2d0 


TOTAL AGRICL^TURAL SHIPMTS a/d/ 








166 


425 


EOSEST PSODUCTS: 












TTnVrll c^un Tr^ iriTm Q T*P Ql n r' P "h P 
xii f^-j. i <^ J. O w X O O J ^ LXlll 0> XC-oXiiO) O Uv>* 




^/ 






n 


Boards , planlcs , scantlings , etc . - 














M.ft. 


1 


1 


21 


47 


Other hoards, planks, etc 


M.ft. 


c/ 


1 


6 


21 










o 


11 


TOTAL ST'ECIEISD ECELST PRODUCTS 








29 


80 


AGRICULTUPAL- 












Total animal products 








SB 


165 


Total vegetable products d/ 








100 


260 


TOTAL AGRICULTURAL SHIPMENTS a/d/ 








166 


425 


TOTAL SHIPMTS (TO VIRGIN 












ISLilTDS) ALL COIv^viODITIES e/, . 








791 


2,011 



Compiled f rom official records of the Bureau of Foreign ar.d Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Reported as a foreign country prior to January 1, 1935. Excludes foreign 
me rchandise, 

\l Reported in value only. 

c/ Less than 500, 

d/ Excludes distilled liquors. 

e./ Inolules foreign merchandise. 



Novenber 30, 1935 7oreign Crops ard Iv-arkets 

T/FEAT: Closing SaUirday prices cf Decem"bor futures 



691 



















eg a/ 






iiuenos 


iJd.Tj e 


Criicago 


Kansa.s City 


Minneapolis 


7[inni"p 


• Liverpool a/ 


Aire 


s "o/ 




19 35 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


; 1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 




Cents 


Cent s 


Cents : 


Cents 


:Cents 


Cents 


Gents 


Cents 


High c/. . 


108 


118 


111 


115 


127 


; 131 


95; 


113 


; 99 


125 


82 


101 


Low cj . . . 


94 


113 


95 


110 


107 


• 126 


82; 


105 


; ■ 86 


116 


66, 


91 


Oct. 31.. 


99 


114 


100 


111 


113 


128 


85: 


106 


91 


119 


76 


93 


llOY . 7. . 


96 


115 


98 


113 


109 


129 


64 ; 


106 


' 90 


116 


■70 


91 


14. . 


96 


117 


96 


113 


113 


' 130 


85: 


106 


83 


118 


68 


92 


21. . 


100 


118 


102 


114 


115 


131 


■ 87 ■ 


106 


91 


118 


71 


93 



'rice 



are of day previous to 



other prices. c/Octoher 1 to date. 

T1IIEA.T : "Jeekly weighted average ca,sh price at stated raax^^ets 





All classes 


No . 


2 


No. 




No . 2 Hard ■ 


No . 


2 


T,' f; s t e rn 


Week 


and grades 


Hard TTintsr :D 


k.N. Spring 


Ainber 


DaruTi '■ 


r.ed TTinter 


Wliite 


ended 


six la^. 


.rkets 


Zansas City ;Minneapoli s 


Minneapo j.i s ' 


St . Loui s 


Seatt 


le a/ 




1935 


1936 


1935 


I r7 ^ ■ 


1955 


1935 


1935 


1936 ; 


1935 


1936 


1 Q % ^ 


1936 




Cent s 




Cents 


5i-ii:k £ • 0 


ents 


Cents 


Cents 


Ceiits ; Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


High "b/. . 


112 


132 


123 


125 i 


139 


150 


121 


157 I 


113 


122 


90 


99 


Low 'bj . . . 


96 


127 


111 


120 


125 


144 


110 


143 ; 


■ 102 


118 


62 


96 


Oct. 31. . 


99 


129 


113 


120 : 


129 


149 


110 


156 ; 


• 105 


118 


S3 


99 


Nov. 7.. 


98 


127 


111 


121 : 


127 


149 


110 


15b ; 


104 


122 


83 




14. . 


95 


129 


111 


121 ; 


125 


144 


115 


]53 : 


102 


121 


82 




21. . 


99 


127 


114 


123 : 


131 


144 


114 


143 ' 


105 


124 


84 





a/ Weekly average 0' 
b/ October 1 to date 



daily cash quo tatxens , basis 



1 sacked. 



POLAND: Pr"ducti-.n of specified crops, 1931-1935 



Year 




Wheat 




Barley 


Potatoes 






1 ,000 


1,000 


1 ,000 


1,000 






bushels 


bu<:hels 








t 




224 , 500 


67,779 


1 , 135. , 517 


1932 


t 


49,472 


240,556 


■ 64,339 


1,101,354 


1933 




79 ,833 


278,450 


65,949 


1,040,9^-1 


1334 




76 ,441 


254,472 


66,717 


1,229,815 


1935 




73,884 


260 ,498 


67,440 


1,194,222 


19 3« 




73 ,253 


253 , 135 


55,219 


1,175,052 



International Institut--^ of Agriculture. 



693 i^orsign Cropa and Markets Vol. 33, No ,22 

TSEAT: Production in specified countries, 1933-1936 



!;ount ry 



19: 



1,000 



633 

892 
122 

697 



United States | 551 

Canada j 281 

Mexico ; 12 

Total H.America, 3 countries : 845 

France ; 362 

Italv ; 293 

Spain ; 138 

'O'erraany | 205 

Poland ; 79 

England and T/ales : 53 

Scotland ; 3 

Ireland ; 

Irish Eree State ; 1 

Czechoslovalcia ; 72 

G-reece ; 28 

Uorrray ; 

Sweden J 26 

Denmark j 11 

ITetherlands : 15 

BelgiuJTi : 15 

Portugal ; 15 

Switzerland ; 4 

Austria ; 14 

Lithuania 8 

liatvia .; 6 

Estonia \ 2 

IPinland '■ 2 

iiUJceal■b^^rg • 

Europe, 24 countries : 1,375 

Bulgaria, : 55 

Hungary ; 95 

pLomania ; 119 

Yugosla -ia i 9G . 582 

Danuhe 5a?,in, 4 countries . . . ; 357, 453 

Europe, 28 countries ; 1,742,562 



548 
235 
920 
883 
735 
472 
227 
983 
896 
335 
755 
337 
543 
325 
067 
073 
557 
615 
192 
725 
451 
460 
995 



454 
356 
071 



1934 



1,000 
hushelg 



526 
275 
___10 

813 



338 
233 
186 
156 
76 
65 
4 

3 
50 
25 

1 
28 
12 
18 
16 
24 

5 
13 
10 



64 
76 

_58 
M-9 



393 
849 
950 



192 



513 

064 

836 

547 

440 

259 

144 

373 

803 

014 

679 

204 

375 

847 

042 

134 

690 

342 

306 

476 

051 

107 

280 
171 



;98 



595 
824 
553 
328 



300 



1,545,993 



.935 



1,000 
'blis^eis- 



623 
277 
10 



911 



284 
283 
157 
171 
73 
50 
4 

6 
62 
27 

23 
14 
15 
14 
22 
5 
15 
10 
5 
2 
4. 

]. 



1,27; 



47 



73 



301 



1,574 



444 
339 
712 



495 



950 

885 

934 

488 

884 

592 

44-3 

362 

636 

095 

180 

869 

511 

672 

653 

780 

092 

989 

509 

093 

520 

267 

23ii 
022 



857 



925 
224 
440 
101 



;90 



547 



1935 



1, 000 

527,233 
233,500 
12.993 



87/ 



244 
253 
121 
159 
78 



23 
2 
19 
12 
16 
15 
8 
/I. 

13 

n 
I 

5 

2 

5 
1 



1.109 



87 
128 
107 



3S2 



1,491,579 



Continued - 



I'Tovem'ber 30, 1936 Porei.gn Crops and Markets 693 



TfHEAT: Production in specified comtries, 1933-1936, cont'd 



CoTintry ■ 1933 


1934 


1935 


1P56 


; 1,000 
: 'bushels 


1 , 000 
hushels 


1,000 
on. she Is 


1 , 000 
hushels 


Algeria 31,998 

Morocco '• 28,902 

[Pu.n-' s • 9,186 


43,523 
39,586 

Ol , ^ ( < 
13,779 


33,533 
20 , 036 

'±0 , id -jJL 

16,534 


27,741 
13,242 

7,716 


North Africa, 4 countries .. : 110,037 


134,170 


113,324 


94,400 


Tnrli p, ' '7p;q QQ'7 


OOX , Got? 

4?, 560 
99,712 


ooo , J- ( 
48,721 
92, 640 


45,196 
80,281 


Asia, 3 countries • 491,547 


499 ,201 


504 , 540 


477,717 


Total, 38 N. H. countries ' 3,189,843 


2,992,551 


3,103,906 


2,937,422 


Australia • 177,338 

Union of South Africa ' 11,752 


240, 669 
133,393 
15.343 


141,021 
142,598 
20,197 


c/ 242,000 
129,484 
15^800 


Total, 3 S. H. Coimtries . . . ; 475,220 


389,405 


303,816 


387,284 


Grand total, 41 countries ', 3,665,063 


3, 381 ,965 


3,407, 722 


3,324,706 



Compiled from official sources except as noted. 

a/ London office, Bureau of Agrricultural Economics, pj Berlin office, 

Barem of Agricultural Economics. c_/ Baenos Aires, Bureau of Agricu-ltural 
Economics . 



CAMABA: Production of specified crops, 1931-1936 



Year of 



...harvest 


Wheat 


P^e 


Barley 


Oat s 


Elayseed 




1,000 


1 , 000 


1 , 000 


1,000 


1 , 000 




■busliels 


hushel s 


"bushels 


bushols 


bushels 


1931 


321,325 


5,322 


67,383 


348,795 


2 , 455 


1932 


443,061 


8 , 470 


30,773 


416,034 


2,719 


1933 


281,892 


4,177 


63,359 


326, 695 


532 


1334 


275 , 849 


4,706 


63,742 


341,190 


910 


1935 


277,339 


9,606 


83,975 


418,995 


1,472 


1935 


233, 500 


4,358 


72,726 


293,532 


1,779 



Dominion Bareeu of Statistics, Ottawa. 



694 



Toreign Crops and Markets 
EYS: Production in specified countries, 



Yol.33, ITo. 22 

1933-1936 



Coo.ntry 


; 1933 


; 1934 


; 1935 


: 1936 




: 1,000 


: 1 , 000 


; 1 , 000 


; 1,000 




"bushel 3__ 


; tushels 


bushels 


; bushels 




; 


i 17,070 


; 58,928 


; 27,095 






j 4 , 706 


: 9 , 606 


: ^:,368 


N. America, 2 countries .. 


; 


21,776 


: 68,534 


■ 

: 31,463 






32 , 983 


29,371 


: 27,988 






21,567 


19,206 


; 18,053 






299,496 


294,399 


i 301,558 






22, 617 


24, 416 


: 13,109 






59,968 


64,501 


! 54,933 






254,472 


260,498 


' 253,135 






26,330 


25,221 


20,235 






395 


483 


430 






20, 673 


17, 116 


14,834 






19,788 


18,434 


20,078 






22,221 


13,522 


14,094 






548 


452 


456 






5,607 


6,267 


a/ 5,900 






1,225 


1,279 


874 






16,055 


14,180 


11,145 






9,064 


6,804 


6,039 






15 5'i4 


15 , 760 


13,188 






10,801 


11,177 


a,/ 9,300 






2,466 


2,183 


2,531 






4,913' 


4, 674 


3, 652 






67; 


69 


aj 79 


United Kingdom 


-191: 


432: 


a/ 400 


a/ 4-00 




1 Q O P , ■ O C • 






( i7 ( , <^ -J- -1- 






6,438; 


7,767; 


7,930 


H'tmgary 


..: 37,P,54_ 


24,3801 


28,650' 


29,174 






8 , 308: 


12 , 724; 


15,747 






7,688: 


7,720: 


8,007 


"Danul^p "RflS'iTi. 4- cmin t.T""! 






o O } O V -t- 


60,908 






894,046: 


890,-^73: 


858,419 






9,589^ 


... 8^03: 


7,544 


Total, 29 countries 


1,039,044^ 


925, 4li: 


967,315; 


897,426 



Compiled from official sources except as noted- 

a/ Berlin office. Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 

,b/ Winter only. 



November 30, 1935 S'oreign Crops arid Markets 695 



YSm GEAirS MU) RYE: ITeeklj a„-rer<?^e price per bushel of corn, rye, 
oats, and "barley a,t leading markets a/ 









C 


orn 






V-je : 


Oa 


■cs 




3::,rl 




T;7eek 
ended 




Chicago 


Sue no s 


Airesli 


linneaioolis ■ 


Chic 


ago 




Minneapolis 


ITo. 5 

YelloTT 


i)\;.t"ares '. 


futures ; 


lie . 


— _; 


1:0. 3 

TTliite 




•To . 


2 

- 




1955 


1936 


1935 


1936 j_ 


1935 : 


1935^J_ 


— .-- 

1935 


1936 ; 


1935 


1936 : 


1^35 1 


1936 




Cent n 


Cents 


Cent- 


Cents: 


Cents; 


Cents; 


Cent 


Gent S| 


Cents 


Cents; 


.Centsi 


Cents 


High h / • • • 


_ 96 


113 


63 


105; 




5o| 






58 




45:. 


• 113: 


135 


Low h / . . . . 


63 


59 


55 
Dec. 


94; 
Dec . ^ ; 


57i 
Dec.; 


47; 
Jan .; 


42 


48: 


27 






- 41' 


• 58 


Oct. 24. . . 


. 81 


103 


61 


94; 


38; 


51: 


. 49 


84' 


29 




41; 


■ 53; 


■ 125 


31. . . 


65 


105 


59 


95; 


38; 


sci 


49 


85; 


29 




43 


■ ■ 65| 


130 


Nov. 7... 


63 


104 


59 


93i 


37: 


43; 


- 49 


86. 


29 




45 


■ 50i 


125 


14. . . 


65 


110 


60 


102i 


37; 


47; 


49 


89; 


29 




45 


55; 


128 


21 . . . 


■ 56 


108 




105'' 




47i. 


-19 


94: 


29 




46: ■ 


■ 5^; 


• 127 


a/ Cash prices are vreighted averag':--s 


■ of rc 




' 


fut'. 


.re ^jr 


ices 


are sirnxole 


averages of 


daily 


qiiotations . 


b/ Fo 


r period Jai 




1 to 1? 


.test 


date 


shov/n. 





ITEED GEAIITS: Movement from principal exrpnrting coiontries 



. i:jgp0 7r&s ■ Snipmen-cTT93D , , Esrport s as Tar 
Commoaity \ r. ■ , ^ / < x t 
; for year . vreek enaed a/ ■ as roioortod 
ana : . ■■ i ^ 

coiontrr 1 1934-33 1935-36: >To v. 7 \ Fov.l4 ; :-Tr.v.2l : J'^l^ ^ : 1935-36; 1936-37 

: \ 'u i -1 ^ to i b/ L M- 

: 1,000 : 1,000 :. 1,000 i 1,000 : 1,000 • : 1,000 : 1,000 

BARLEY, EjCPORITS: c/ : _biishjslJ biiah£.lrf iiii;^^ ; iiisJislr- biiaoiils 

United States ; 4,050 9,836:. 52 C; 0 lvov.21 i 5,135: 3,705 

Canada ; 14,453 5,882: \ \ \ Oct. 31 j 2,820: 10,530 

Argentina. \ 20,73^ 9,463. 4CS5. ; j Eov. 7 i 2,192: 2,796 

Darmbe 8c U.S.S.R...: ll,25Cj 37,375:. 57^ 1,526: 1, 139; Imov. 21 j 29.291: 15,852 

Total ; 50,492 53, 611;. "" \ : : _ : 59,439; 35,965 

OATS, EXPOHTS: cj ': " : ; " : "T"" " \ \ 

United States ; .1,147; 1,429: 3 d Q lTov.21 ; 388; 233 

Canada ; 17,407 14,892: : ! ; 0ct.31 ; 5,058; 4,409 

Argentina \ 43,753; 9,79Q 558; 463 213 Nov. 21 j 6,134; 4,258 

Danube 8c U.S.S.R. . Sj_444 2,847; Q -U d Ho v. 21 \ 1^20: 300 

Total LJlO,-251_2S^9^: '■ \ ; L i2,500:, '"l,^ 

COEI^T, EXPORTS: d/ i ; : : : " Hqy.,! t p: . ; 

United States ; 380 837: ij Q J;^v.21 \ i; 1 

Danube & U.J3.S.R. .. : 14,933: 14,934: 77; 502^ 17q'-^v-.21; 579: 749 

Argentina j 255 , 143; 304, 789: 9,267; 8,712 8 ,52'/ -3^- ; 16,155; 26,506 

South Africa \ 21. 082: 8 ,910 : 62i; TZi ^n: Eov.2l : 2,13 4: 6 65 

To t al , ^ 293,844-; 3 29 ,520 : ; \ \ : 13,37 9: 2 7,919" 

United States \e] ~ \ ej~ ' : ": : ! 

Jjg^ orts " : 36.45li 15.399' [ ■ \ ; ; 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ The weeks dh^wn in these colujnns are 
nearest to the date shotvn. b/ Preliminary. c/ Year beginning July 1. d/ Year, 
^beginning November 1. e^/ ITovember-September. 



695 S'oreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, Ho. 22 



OLIVES: Price at end of month for average assortment of sizes, 
f.c.l). Seville, Spain, January 1934 to OctolDer 1936 a/ 
(in dollars per fenega of 97 poimds) 





Prime 


Second 


; Manzanilla 


Prime 




Date 


Queens 


Que en s 


[first quality 


Queens 


•Majizanilla 




plain 


plain 


; plain ■ 


stuffed 


stuffed 


1934 














9.3S 


6.43 


5.53 


14.14 


10.67 




9.88 


7.18 


5.15 


15.98 


11.24 


Mar 


10.34 


7.35 


5.85 


17.01 


11. "'S ■ 








5 92 


16.92 


12.80 


May 


10.10 


7.23 


5.87 


16.11 


12.83 




10 . 12 


7.25 


5.88 


15.27 


12.85 




10 . 25 


7.24 ; 


5.87 


15.80 


12.02 


Aug 


10.27 


7.36 ; 


5.97 


16.52 


11.94 


Sept 


10.05 


7.44 ; 


5.92 


lf^.25 


11.43 


Oct 


9.96 


7.23 : 


5.87 


15.42 


11.06 




9.56 


7.24 ; 


5.87 


15.44 


11.05 


Dec 


8.91 


6.72 : 


5.90 


15.08 


10.59 


1935 












Jan 


8.33 


6.65 ; 


5.84 


14.80 


10.45 


FelD 


8.58 


6.61 ; 


5.65 


14.87 


10.33 


Mar 


8 . 45 


6.55 ; 


. 5.46 


14.05 


10.10 


J\P I 






5 49 


14 .13 


10.15 


May 


7.91 


6.68 : 


5.59 


13.64 


9.96 


June 


7.98 


6.46 1 


5.64 


13.48 


10.04 


J^^iy • 


7.82 


6.72 ; 


5.63 


12.90 


10.02 


Aug 


7.80 


6.43 : 


5.61 


12.87 


■ 9.72 


Sept 


7.78 


6. 55 ; 


5.60 


12.69 


9.69 


Oct 


8.60 


7.23 i 


5.60 


12.59 


11.33 


Nov 


8.61 


7.24 i 


5.60 


12.98 


11.34 


Dec 


8.77 


7.27 i 


5. 62 


13.15 


11.38 


1936 












Jan 


8.72 


7.34 : 


5.95 


13.15 


11.49 


Feb 


8.73 


7.34 ; 


5.96 


13.16 


11.50 


Mar 


8.05 


6.95 i 


5.87 


12.56 


11.33 


Apr 


7.91 


6.55 i 


5.87 


12.28 


11.32 


May 


7.23 


6.27 [ 


5.87 


11 . 59 


11.32 


J"'j-ne 


7.02 


5,95 : 


5.69 


11.92 


11.25 


Oct. 15. . . . 


12.00 


8 . 50 : 




17.50 


15.50 


Oct. 24 


13 . 00 


9.50 ; 


11.00 


18.50 


■ 18.00 



Compiled "by American Consulate, Seville, Spain. 

a/ Up to and including June 1936 prices represent conversions from pesetas, 
while those for OctolDer 1936 represent actual dollar quotations. 



NovemlDer 30, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



697 



OLiYES: Estimated q-uantity pickled in Seville Consular district 

' of Sprdn, 1929-1936 



Year 


Queens 


Manzpni lias 


Total 




Short tons 


Short tons 


Short tons 


1929 - 


49,900 


23,800 


73,700 


1930 


600 


4,900 


5 , 500 




24,300 


12,400 


36,700 


1932 


8,800 


21,800 


30 , 600 


1933 


15 , 500 


14 , 600 


30 , 100 


1934 


15,200 


17,000 


32,200 


Average for 6 years. . . 


19 , 050 


15,750 


34,800 


1935 


13,000 


19,000 


32,000 


1936, preliminary 


2,500 


5,000 


7 ,500 



Compiled "by Agricultural Att'"'cho 11. I. Nielsen, Paris, Emnce. 



OLIVES: Amounts declared for shipment from the Seville Consular district 
of Spain to the United States, 1932-193 6 a/ 



Year 


Queens 


M an anil las 


Total 




Short tons 


Short tons 


Short tons 


14,087 
10,256 
10,393 
11,153 

8 ,952 

9 ,877 


3,694 
3 , 702 
5,657 
7,781 
6,239 
6,755 


17,781 
13,958 
16,050 
18,934 
15,191 
16,632 




1934 


1935 


1935 to end of Septemher 

1936 to end of September 



Compiled by Agricultural Attache N. I. Nielsen, Paris, France. 

a/ Converted from gallons on the hasis of 6 pounds of fruit to the gallon. 



698 Foreign Crop;j and Markets Vol. 33, Ho. 2 

COTTON: Price per pound of representative raw cotton at Liverpool, 
HovemlDer 20, 1936, v/ith comparisons 



1936 



Growth 


October 


1 


Joveniher 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


6 


13 


20 




Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Ceiots 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cent s 


-American - 




















14.42 


14.02 


14.25 


14.18 


13.87 


J-t: .wo 


13.64 


13.77 




13.39 


13.00 


13.03 


12.95 


12. 65 


12. 64 


12.26 


12.39 


■-Egyptian (Fully trood fair)- 




















21.72 


21.63 


22 . 22 


22.57 


23.26 


23.08 


23.83 


23.00 


Uppers 


15.63 


15.37 


15.45 


15.36 


14.77 


15.05 


14.94 


15.20 


Brazilian (Fair) - 






















13.00 


13.23 


13.16 


12.99 


13.14 


12.77 


12.90 


Sao Paulo 


13.81 


13.51 


13.74 


13 . 67 


13.50 


13.65 


13.27 


13.41 


East Indian - 


















Broach (Fully good) 


11.73 


11.47 


11.50 


11.22 


11.12 


11.32 


10.96 


11.12 


C.P.Qomra Ho. 1 , superfine 


12.06 


11.79 


11.82 


11.55 


11.45 


11. 64 


11.28 


11.51 


Sind (Fully good) 


10 . 21 


9.97 


9.85 


9 .57 


9.57 


9.71 


9.45 




Peruvian (Good) 


















Tanguis 


16.89 


16.58 


17.00 


17.13 


17.07 


17.21 


16.83 





Converted at current exchange rate. 



BUTTER: Price per pound in Hew York, San Frcncisco, Copenhagen, and London, 
HovemTjer 26, 1936, with c o mpg.ri sons 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange 
a/ Quotation is for preceding day. 
Hot available. 



Market and description 


Hov ember 19 


Hov ember 26 


November 28 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


34.0 
33.0 
20.7 

26.2 
23.9 
22.2 
21.6 


£./ 34.2 
£./ 34.0 
20.7 

26.0 
23.3 
21.8 
21.0 


a/ 32.5 
2,/ 35.5 
22.2 

27.7 
21.7 
23.2 

^/ 




Coperih::gen, official quotation.. 
London : 











November 30, 1936 foreign Crops and Markets 699 

BUTTER: liov Zealand grading, 1936-37 season to November 13, 



with coraD orisons 



Date - 


• 1934^35 


; 1935-35 


; 1936-37 


Week ended 

August total 

September 4 

11 

18 

25 . . 

September total 

October 2 , . 

9 

15 

23 

30 

October total 

November 6 

13 

Total August 1 to iToveraber 13 . 


1,000 po-'onds 


: 1,000 po'inds 


: 1, COO pounds 


: 12,852 


14, 717 


12, 225 


: 4, 733 
: 5,432 
6, 261 
5, 580 


4,368 
: 5,040 
: 5,376 

5,763 


: 5,040 
5 , 544 
5,880 

: 6,664 


23,011 


20, 552 


23,128 


: 7, 7'jO 
8,333 

8, 848 
9,156 

9, 968 


5, 495 
: 7,633 
: 8,232 

9, 206 
: 9,576 


7, 560 
8, 120 
\ 8,960 
: .9,520 
: 9,744 


44,005 


41,143 


43, 904 


10, 192 
10, 416 


10,248 
10, 136 


10, 350 
11.200 


100, 476 


95,796 


100,817 , 


Agricultural Attach^ C. C Te^ylc 

BUTTER: Australian gr^ 

w: 


)r, London. 

iding, 1935-37 season to ITov ember 7, 
Lt.h comp.arisons 


Bate 


1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 


Week ended 

July 1 to Aiigust 29 

September 5 

12 

19 

26 

September total 

October 3 

10 

17 

, 

31 

October total 

Total July 1 to October 31 .... 


1,000 pounds 
14, 561 


1,000 pounds 
11,744 


1,000 pounds 
7, 997 


2, 912 
3,835 

4, 482. 

5, 078 


2,379 
3,040 
3,076 
3, 940 


2, 612 
2,539 
3,060 

3, 759 


16,307 


12, 435 


12,070 


5,784 

6,500 
5, 516 
7, 302 
8,617 


4, 771 
5,383 : 
6,704 : 
7, 155 

7, 728 


3, 721 
4,059 

4, 731 
4, 525 
4,988 


34, 719 


31, 741 


22, 024 


: 55,587 


55,920 : 


42, 091 



Weekly Dairy Produce Notes, Imperial Economic Conmittec. 



700 



Foreign Crops and .Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 22 



GRAINS: Exports .froni tiie United States, July 1-I^ov. 21, 1935 a^d 1936 
POM: Exports from the United States, Jan. 1-lTov. 21, 1935 and 1935 





JuJ.y 1- 


ilov . 21 




Teek 


encied 




1935 : 


1936 


Oct. 31 : 


ITov . 7 : 


Nov. 14 


IJov . 21 


: 


1,000 : 


1, jOO 


1 , 000 : 


1,000 : 


1,000 


1,000 


GHAUTS: : 


busuels': 


busnol s 


Dusaels : 


"ousnels : 


busnels; 


busnels 




lib;: 


1, 550 


296': 


2: 


0 


1 




6,373: 


5, 602 


122: 


99: 


42 


141 




5,13G:: 


3, 705 


ll2: 


■ 62: 


' ■ ■ 0 


0 




66.: 


152 


0: 
0: 


1: 


' ' ■ ■ 0 


c 




218': 


20 


3: 


■ ' 0 


1 


Rye : 


4: 


0 


.0: 


0: 


0 


0 




Jan. 1 


- i:ov.2]. 












] , 000 : 


1 , o: jO 


1 , O^jO. : 


1 , 0 ju : 


1 , 0 JO 


■ 1,000 


POEK : : 


po'onds : 


pounds 


■00 lands : 


oO'inds : 


pounds 


pounds 


Hans and shoulders 


49, 355: 


36, 379 


264: 


■'£/ : 


794 


912 


Bacon, includinc^; sides. : 


5, 893.: 


4,335 


69: 


cy : 


62 


266 




7, 422: 


9,352 


150: 


c/ ■ : 


501 


81 


Lard, excliiding neatral: 


85, 504: 


94, 123 


1,981: 


c/ : 


3,010 


: 1,283 



Official records, Bureau of Forei^'^n and Donestic Cornnerce. a/' Included this 
week: pacific por'ts, wheat, none, floior, hone; froy.i San Pran^cisco, barley, none, 
rice, none. W Includes flour- inil3ed in bond - from" 'Gavnadian wheat, in terms of 
wneat. cj l"eek' s fi.g-ures not reported, presumablv combined with week of ITov. 14. 



'-7HEAT, INCLUDIpG FLOUR: Shi;';-(nent s from principal ey;D0'rting co-antries 
as given by current traAie sources, 1934-35 to 1936-37 



Country 


: Total 

shi orients 




-p:nents 1935 : - Sxiipr.ients 
-eek ended :July 1 - IJov. 21 


1934-35:1935-36 


: ITOV. 7 


hcv.l4 


Nov, 21: 1935-36 


: 1936-37 


north America a/ ..... 
C an ada , 4 inaxk e t s b/ . . 


1 , J' J -J : 1 , 
•busliel 3': bushel s 


i. , '.j'^'u : 
bushels: 


1 , JUO 
bushel n 


l,Ol'0 : 1,0'JO 
bu sh e 1 s : bu she 1 s 


1,000 
bushels 


:162, 832:219, 588 
176,059:245:, 199 
21,532: 15,930 


5, 776 
8,033: 
101: 


6:, 04'^ 
, 6:, 066 
: .42. 


5,006: 69,232 
5,139:146,037 
142: 6,491 


116,032 
130, 626 
7 . 252 


Argentina 


185, 228: 77,384 
.111-, 528: 110, 060 
1,672: 30,224 
4, 104: 8, 216 
c/2'. 318: c/2, 529 


1, 60o ; 
1,732: 

■ .-2,055: 
830,.: 


1 , 324 
L-,651 
: . ■ 0- 
2, 304 


■ 1,070:- 44,944 
975: 37,3-28. 
0: 19,032 
.1,160: 6,224. 


22,722 
26, 558 

88 

33,816. 
4,792 


Russia. • • • • 

Danube and Bulgaoria <lj 


: 248 


352: 256 


Total©/ 

Total European snip- 

ments a/ 

Total ex-EU'Ope<'in : ■ 

ahipm.unts a / ......... 


468, 7 6 2 : 44b,lul 






- . : 177, 01-6 - 


204. OC'8 


.387, 752:355,032 


■10,'096: 




. :f/ - - 
: 125, -120 


II 

142.912 


147,958:133,528 


/ -/S, 384: 




: 44, 608 


i/ 
52,368 



oofflhall 



' s Corn Trade News. 



RuDert, and New Westminster. 



Compiled from official an-d trade sources, a/ 3i 
b/ Fort William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, princt 
c/ Official. d/ Black Sea shioments only. _e/ Total of trade figures includes 
North America as reported by Broomliall. f/' To yovGraber 7. 



Hovemter 30, 1936 



rortiigii CrcpB "nd Markets 



701 



E^iCHANGS HJ^TJiS: Average v/eekly ^rA ir.cntrily values in lIe\Y York of 
Specified. ctirre-ncies , N^^v ember 21, 1936. \,-ith coi.ipar isons a/ 

V.'eek ended 



ivionth 



\j oiui z ry 


lion':; tar y 


1934 


i.935 


i 


9^0 




1936 






unit 


Oct. 


Oct. 


Aug. : 


Sept ,; 


Oct. : 


iJOV. 

7 


Nov , 

14 


Xj :'V. 






Gents 


C3nts 


Cents 1 


Cents ; 


Cents ; 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Jij-gentina. . 


Paper peso 


32.95 


32.71 


33.50; 


33 . 61: 


; 

32.57; 


32.55 


32.53 


32.59 


d ^ 1-^ 




102. ?c 

i ♦ »^ 


98 .58 
35 . 61 


99 . 9 S; 


100.02; 
29. 94; 


100.02; 
29, 33; 


100.04 
29.38 


100,12 
29.44 


100. 13 
29.47 


on ma 


Snail -r^. yuan 




PZrone 


22. Ob 
494. Oo 


21 . 91 
490. 78 


22 . 43; 
502, 59; 


2^. 48. 
d03, 63. 


21. o7j 
489. 84. 


21,30 
488.32 


21 , 78 
483.00 


<cl. cS3 


Jiingxanti, , , , 


? ound 


Trance 


jj J. £jnc 


5.62 


6.59 


6.59; 




4. 57; 


4.64 


4.64 


4.65 


Geraany. , . , 


Heichsmark, 


40.45 


40.23 


40.22; 


40.03; 


40.20: 


40.21 


40.22 


40.23 


Italy 


Lira 

Yon, 


6.61 

28.68, 


8.12 
28,57 


7.87. 
29 . 40i 


7,85: 
29.41: 


5.53; 


5.26 

28.54 


5 # /^fi 
28.52 


5.25 
58.58 


J2,pan« 


23* 61; 


Mexico 


Peso : 


27.75 


27.76 


<d7. rOt 


27.75i 


27.75: 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


Netherlands 


Guilder , , . . 


58.09; 


67.74 


67.90:. 


66. 74: 


53, 63; 


53, 78 


53, 83 


54.05 


Norway 


krone 


24.83: 


24. 66 


25 « [ 


25. 50; 


24. 6I; 


2i4.53 




24. 55 




Krona • 

Franc 


25.48i 
32.77: 


25. 30 


25, 91; 
32. 60; 


25. 96; 
31.42: 


25.25: 
22.99: 


25.17 

22.98 


25 . -lo 

22, 9 9 


25 . 20 
22.99 


Switzerland 


32.53 



Federal Reserve Board, a/' Noon "buying rates for cable transfers. 



LIVESTOCK iiND MEAT; 
.. . Novernbe 



price per 100 pomids in specified 
J-8, 193 6y yith.. com parisons a/ 

17ee 



Liur G p e an iiia rke t s . 



Market and item 



Germany: 

price of nogs, Perlin 

price of lard, tcs. , Eamb-'Jirg 

United Kingdom: b/ 

prices at Liverpool first quants'- 

America.n greon belliec ..... . . 

Danish vViltskire sides 

Canadian green sides., 

Anerican snort ctit green liains., 

ijnerican refined lard 



ended 



November 20, ; November 11, 
1935 ; 1936 



17.70 
15.69 



i^orni/'Bl 
18.76 
15.83 
19.54 



dollars 

17,70 
13.52 



17,99 
19.59 
17.52 
20.46 
13,83 



November 18, 
1935 



Dollar s 

17.70 
13. 61 



18.12 
19. o5 

17.57 
20.52 
13.92 



Li.erpnol q.uota.tions are on the basis of sale from importer to vflrxolesaier . 
ay Converted at current rate of excnange. b/ Week ended 5Y-iday. 



702 



Fcroitm CrcDS and Markets 



Vol. 33, 110. 22 



Ind-ox 



Late catles 652 

Crop c?xi.d. i/iarkot prospects S5G 



Agr i Q- il t-QX al r e exp o r t s , 



U.S., 193 



-,.')b 



661 



666 
-690 



AGRICULTUHAL TRADE WITH TERRITORIES, 

UNITED STATES, 1935-36 667 

BoJ-ley: 

Production : 

Algeria, 1935,1935 652 

Austri,a, 1935,1935 652 

Canada, 1931-1936 693 

Poland, 1931-1936 691 

Butter: 
Gradlngs: 

Av.stralia, Oct. 31, 1936 699 

K(HW Z':^aland, Nov. 13, 1936 699 

prices, specified markets, 

Nov. 26, 1936 698 

Corn, production 

Austria, 1935,1936 652 

Cotton: 

Prices, U.E., ITov. 26', 1936 698 

Situation, Bui'O'oe, Octo'ber 193 54 
Stocks, Eoropo, Oct. 31, 1936 655 

Exchange rates, foreign, 

Nov. 21, 1936 701 

r lax seed, production, 

Canada, 1931-1936 693 

Grains: 

Ex-;jorts, U.S., NOV. 21, 1936 700 

Prices (feed), t'.rincipal markers, 

Nov. 21, 10.30" 69 5 

Movement (feed), uriuc-ip::.! couatries, 

Nov. 21, 193:; 6 95 

Meat (pori-c): 

2xx;0rts, U.S., Nov. 21, 1936 ..... 71*0 
Pr i c G 'o , 1 0 V i nor Ic o t s , 

Nov. 18, iS30 701 



Page 

Oats: 

proauction: 

Algeria, 1935,1935 652 

Austria, 1935,1936 652 

Caiiada, 1931-1936 693 

0].ives: 

•Exports- to U. Si , Spain, 1932-1935 597 

prices, Spain, 1934-1936 696 

production, Spain, 1929-1936 . 657,697 
?oto.tGes: 
Production; 

Austria, 1935,1936 .. 652 

Poland, 1931-1936 591 

Rye: 



Nov. 21, 1 



Q7,. 



691 



Prices, U.S. 
production: 

Austrir., 1935,1936 G52 

Canada, ±931-1936 693 

Poland, 1931-1936 691 

Specified countries, 1933-1936 . 694 
Sugai" "beets, production, 

Austria, 1935,1936 552 

VegetaNles (fresh), exoorts, 

CuDa, 1936-37 556 

v7heat: 

Gov ernm cnt r egul at i on s , Er nnc c , 

Oct, 29, 1936 556 

H-?a"'vosting conditions, Argentina, 

NovoinDcr 1936 652 

Production : 

Algeria, 1935,1936 652 

Argentina, 1936 653 

Austria, 1935,1936 652 

Canada, 1931-1936 6S3 



Dai.uD.. B^-sin, 1935,1936 

Eui'Opc, 1055,1936 

Polrnd, 1931-1:^36 

Spoci-ied countries, 1935-193: 
■,7ool, siti.vition, Eropo, 

October 1936 , 



65-3 

G53 

C92 
658 



1